Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields:

Florida, Northern Jacksonville area

© 2002, © 2004 by Paul Freeman. Revised 10/5/04.

 

Cecil Field NAS (revised 5/5/04) - Hart NOLF / Hart Field (revised 10/5/04)

Jacksonville Municipal / Jacksonville AAF / Imeson Field (revised 5/7/04)

Jasper Intermediate Field (revised 3/6/04) - Mile Branch NOLF (revised 7/18/04)

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Hart NOLF / Hart Field, Jacksonville, FL

30.33 North / 81.76 West (West of Downtown Jacksonville, FL)

A 1943 US Government aerial photo of Hart NOLF, from the FL DOT (courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel).

 

This former airfield had an extremely short life in its original role as a military airfield.

According to Army Corps of Engineers documents (courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel),

the Navy acquired 220 acres by lease for Hart Outlying Field in early 1942.

The Naval Air Advanced Training Command developed the site

and used it to support flight training operations in the Jacksonville area.

Only nine months later, in November 1942, the Navy terminated the lease & returned the land to the owners.

 

After the Navy left, the field was apparently reused as a civilian airport for several years.

 

The April 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

described Hart Field as having a 3,100' unpaved runway.

It also indicated that Navy flight operations were conducted from the field,

which may have been inaccurate by that point.

 

Hart Field was depicted as a commercial or municipal airport

on the February 1945 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

A 1945 SLR site map of depicted Hart Field as having an L-shaped landing area, measuring 4,000' east/west by 2,400' north/south.

Two buildings (hangars?) were depicted on the northeast corner of the field.

 

A 1945 Navy document (according to Brian Rehwinkel) described Hart Field as having four sod runways (the longest of which was 3,100'),

as well as having a 100' x 75' wooden hangar.

 

Another hangar was apparently added in later years

(and this hangar still remained standing on the Northeast corner of the property as of 1994).

 

A January 1952 US Government aerial photo of Hart Field, from the FL DOT (courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel).

The field (and its hangars) still remained intact, but no aircraft were visible on the field,

so it may have been closed by this point.

 

Hart Field was evidently abandoned at some point between 1945-56,

as it was no longer depicted at all on the 1956 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

 

As seen in the above January 1994 USGS aerial photo (courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel),

most of the site has been reused as an industrial park,

with the western portion of the former field being occupied by Interstate 295.

However, amazingly, one of Hart Field's former wooden hangars remained standing, on the Northeast corner of the site.

 

 An October 2004 photo by John Deffes of the WW2-era hangar which remains standing at the site of Hart NOLF.

"There is indeed an intact hangar there at the corner of Commonwealth & Lane Avenue.

This definitely looks like an old hangar, and as far as I can tell, matches up perfectly with the two pictures from Terraserver.

I'd like to do some more looking around the area, but it's largely an industrial area & fences are everywhere."

 

The site of Hart Field is located south of the intersection of Interstate 295 & Commonwealth Avenue.

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Jasper Intermediate Field, NO-JX Airway, Jasper, FL

30.48 North / 82.93 West (West of Jacksonville, FL)

Jasper Landing Field, as depicted on the November 1936 "Official Airway Map of FL" (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

Jasper Intermediate Field (or Site 43) was one of the Department of Commerce's network of Intermediate Fields,

which were established in the 1930s for the emergency use

of commercial aircraft flying along Airways between major cities.

 Site 43 was an Intermediate Field along the New Orleans - Jacksonville Airway.

 

The date of construction of Site 43 has not been determined.

The earliest depiction of the field which has been located

was on the November 1936 "Official Airway Map of FL" (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It depicted the field as having two runways.

 

The Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airports Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo)

described the Jasper Auxiliary Field as being located 2 miles south of Jasper,

and having two sod runways: 1,800' southeast/northwest & 1,600' northwest/southeast.

 

The April 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

described Site 43 as an Intermediate Field along the New Orleans - Jacksonville Airway.

It described the airfield as having a 3,600' unpaved runway,

and indicated that both Army & Navy flight operations were conducted from the field.

 

Site 43 was described in the same fashion

in the December 1944 Army/Navy Airfield Directory (according to Brian Rehwinkel).

 

According to Brian Rehwinkel, "I have read this field was used by the Navy fields in Jacksonville

as an OLF during the war [WW2] (although the directory does not refer to it as an OLF),

so it is possible that it was not used a great deal after WW2." 

 

The February 1945 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

labeled the field as "Japser Landing Field, Site 43".

 

The above February 1947 aerial photo, from the FL DOT (courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel)

depicted Site 43 as consisting of a grass field with two runways.

There did not appear to be any hangars or other permanent buildings at the airfield.

Note the two aircraft (type undetermined) on the field (just northeast of the runway intersection),

and a third aircraft (south of the runway intersection).

 

A later aerial photo of Site 43 from March 1947 (from the FL DOT, courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel)

did not happen to depict any aircraft at the field.

 

Jasper was still depicted as an active civilian airport

on the February 1949 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

The Site 43 Airway beacon was also still depicted as being operational.

 

The Jasper Landing Field was apparently abandoned at some point between 1949-62,

as it was not listed in the 1962 AOPA Airport Directory,

and it was not depicted at all on the 1964 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).

 

 

As seen in the above December 1998 USGS aerial photo,

the outline of the former runways is still apparent in the outline of relatively newly-planted trees,

which have been planted in neat rows in the area formerly occupied by the runways.

This suggests that the area of the former runways may have remained cleared for some period of time.

 

The site of the Jasper airfield is located south of the intersection of Route 41 & Route 129,

3.5 miles Southeast of Jasper.

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Mile Branch Naval Outlying Landing Field, FL

30.23 North / 81.8 West (Southwest of Jacksonville, FL)

A June 1943 aerial view of Mile Branch NOLF, from the FL DOT (courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel).

 

Mile Branch was apparently established during WW2 as one of the large number

of auxiliary airfields used to support Naval flight training in the Jacksonville area.

The date of construction of the field has not been determined,

but it apparently was not a pre-WW2 civilian airport,

as it was not listed in The Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airports Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo).

The earliest depiction of Mile Branch NOLF which has been located

was the above June 1943 aerial view from the FL DOT (courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel).

It depicted Mile Branch as consisting of an irregularly shaped grass field,

with no buildings or hangars visible.

 

Mile Branch was not listed in the April 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

or the December 1944 Army/Navy Airfield Directory (according to Brian Rehwinkel).

This doesn't necessarily mean it was inactive by this time -

it may have been overlooked, as one of numerous small satellite airfields in the Jacksonville area.

 

Mile Branch NOLF, as depicted on the February 1945 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

According to Brian Rehwinkel, "As with many of the other OLFs in the Jacksonville area,

when the Jacksonville air stations began doing less primary pilot training,

several of the OLFs were converted to bomb targets.

This was apparently the case with Mile Branch.

It was listed in August of 1945 as a bomb target for NAAS Cecil Field.

Mile Branch was owned by the Navy & was listed as inactive by February 1947.

Mile Branch may have been used after the war as an airfield."

 

"Mile Branch Air Field", as depicted on an August 1949 FDOT County Road Map (courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel).

It is not clear from this depiction whether it was a military or civilian airfield at this point.

 

A January 6, 1952 aerial view of Mile Branch NOLF, from the FL DOT (courtesy of Brian Rehwinkel).

"In this photo, you can see a small hangar has been placed on the eastern edge of the field & 5 aircraft are visible.

Also visible are the outlines of two runways - an East/West runway & a Northwest/Southeast runway.

This photo was probably taken during the time this field was used as a civilian airport."

 

The February 1956 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

depicted Mile Branch as a civilian airport with two runways, the longest being an 1,850' "flint" strip.

 

The Mile Branch Airport was apparently closed at some point between 1956-62,

as it was not listed in the 1962 AOPA Airport Directory,

and it was not depicted at all on the 1964 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).

 

 

As seen in the above January 1994 USGS aerial photo,

the overall outline of the former airfield is still barely apparent.

The area of the former airfield had been covered by a mix of residential housing & pine trees.

The outline of the former airfield access road is still barely recognizable on the northwest corner of the property.

 

The site of Mile Branch NOLF is located northeast of the intersection of Old Middleburg Road & Marlee Road,

three miles east of Cecil Field.

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Jacksonville Municipal Airport / Jacksonville Army Airfield / Imeson Field,

Jacksonville, FL

30.42 North / 81.64 West (Southeast of Jacksonville International Airport, FL)

Jacksonville Municipal Airport,

as depicted on the 1929 Rand-McNally "Standard Map of GA with Air Trails" (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

Jacksonville's original municipal airport was opened in 1927

on the site of a 175 acre prison farm located north of downtown Jacksonville.

It had a 2,100' cinder & shell runway, a 2,500' grass runway, an administration building & a hangar.

In its first year, the new airport was visited by Charles Lindbergh.

 

An aerial view of Jacksonville Municipal Airport,

from The Airport Directory Company's 1933 Airports Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It described Jacksonville Municipal Airport as having three 2,500' asphalt runways (very substantial for 1933!).

Furthermore, it said that "A new runway 2,500' long & 500' in width,

running generally northwest/southeast is being completed."

The aerial photo in the directory depicted one large hangar & a row of smaller hangars.

The manager was listed as Herbert Maloney.

The operator was listed as Eastern Air Transport,

which was said to provide schedule mail & passenger service.

 

The 1934 Department of Commerce Airport Directory (according to Chris Kennedy)

described Jacksonville Airport as having four "sandy, sodded, surfaced" runways, all 2,500' long.

 

An aerial view of Jacksonville Municipal Airport,

from The Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airports Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo).

It described Jacksonville Municipal Airport as having four 2,500' asphalt runways.

The aerial photo in the directory depicted a row of hangars on the side of the airfield.

The manager was listed as Major H. A. Maloney.

 

The Jacksonville office of the National Weather Service was located at Imeson Field from 1940-1971.

 

A 1940s view of the Jacksonville Airport terminal building.

 

By 1941, the airport had expanded to 600 acres,

acquiring five additional hangars & a terminal building,

and five asphalt runways, the longest of which was 7,000'.

Airline service was provided by Eastern Airlines, Orlando Airlines, and National Airlines

(which made Jacksonville its headquarters).

 

With the start of WW2, the Army began to use Jacksonville for antisubmarine missions in 1941,

until turning that mission over to the Navy two years later.

 

A 1944 aerial photo of Jacksonville Municipal #1 Naval Auxiliary Air Station (National Archives photo).

 

A 1944 photo of PB4Y-1 Privateers on the ramp at Jacksonville Municipal #1 Naval Auxiliary Air Station (National Archives photo).

 

A 1944 Army diagram of Jacksonville #1 (courtesy of George Miller).

 

The Navy commissioned Naval Auxiliary Air Station Jacksonville #1 in 1944.

The primary Navy tenant of the base became Operational Training Units for PB4Y-1 Liberator patrol Bombers.

By 1945, the station began to use the improved PB4Y-2 Privateer.

The base's maximum aircraft complement was reached in 1945,

with a total of 67 aircraft onboard.

 

Jacksonville Airport, as depicted on the February 1945 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

After the end of WW2, the Navy returned the field to the City of Jacksonville,

which reopened the field as a civil airport named Imeson Field.

It was depicted as "Imeson" on the 1949 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy).

 

Imeson Field was depicted on the February 1956 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

as having four paved runways, with the longest being 7,000'.

 

Imeson Field was described in the 1962 AOPA Airport Directory

as having three paved runways, and the operator was listed as Laurie Yonge Flying Service.

 

On the 1964 Jacksonville Sectional Chart,

the longest runway at Imeson Field was depicted as being 7,900'.

 

An April 3 1966 USDA aerial photo (courtesy of the FL DOT via Brian Rehwinkel) of Imeson Field.

Interestingly, several airliners are visible at the terminal on the western side of the field (including what appears to be 2 727s).

This photo was taken only a year or two before the airport closed.

 

As jet airliners were introduced, the geographic limitations which precluded further lengthening

of the runways of Imeson Field became a fatal liability.

The new Jacksonville International Airport was opened to the north in 1967,

and Imeson Field presumably closed at some point shortly thereafter.

 

A circa-1980s photo by George Miller of the last remaining hangar at the former Jacksonville AAF.

 

A circa-1980s photo by George Miller of the former firing range backstop building at Jacksonville AAF,

which was previously filled with tons of sand & lead.

 

The airport property was reused as Imeson International Industrial Park,

with numerous buildings being constructed over the former runways.

The remaining southeastern portion of Runway 30 has been reused as Imeson Park Boulevard.

 

 

As of the above 1994 USGS aerial photo, remaining portions of at least four paved runways were still evident.

 

John Deffes recalled in 2003, "In the 1980s & 90s I used to practice my motocross out there at Imeson,

and was told it was the old JIA, but didn't really believe it.

Although it did indeed have some long concrete patches that made me wonder. Now I know."

 

John Deffes visited the site of Imeson Field in 2003. His report:

"We had a great few hours out at Imeson today.

It really is rewarding to go out to these old airfields and look around.

Of course, I guess it helps to love Aviation & Archeology."

 

A 2003 photo by John Deffes of the only remaining hangar at Imeson Field.

 

A 2003 photo by John Deffes of a remaining taxiway which led to Runways 18 & 23.

 

A 2003 photo by John Deffes, looking northeast at the end of Runway 23.

 

A 2003 photo by John Deffes of the former Runway 30 Hold Short area.

 

A 2003 photo by John Deffes, looking southeast along the former Runway 30.

 

A 2003 photo by John Deffes of the southeast end of the former Runway 23.

 

A 2003 photo by John Deffes of one of the two remaining former Armory buildings at Imeson Field.

 

"We found many portions of old runways & taxiways, and we even found the fabled old hangar.

We ran into an old fella that works out at the park, Ray, and he was a good source of info.

At first he warned us about trespassing, but after I told him I was interested in the old airfield,

he went on about, 'I was born just across the road 72 years ago.'

Suddenly we were okay & he couldn't wait to tell us everything he knew.

He told me about two old National Guard Armory buildings

I would have never recognized without his help, and even led us there in his truck.

Ray is in the photo of the Guard Armory buildings.

The fence & signs on the Guard buildings are all original.

One sign says, 'Leave matches and no lighters.'

Another sign had a small silver box with a chain in it that used to hold a telephone key (?) according to Ray.

You used the key to call a guard inside the Armory so you could get in.

Also, Ray said that the old hangar, as he remembers it, was used for tire & wheel maintenance."

 

A 2003 photo by John Deffes of the concrete remains of an unidentified building, located east of the only remaining hangar.

 

"Ray was also able to tell me where the old Terminal building was (approximately).

It no longer stands, but we did see some bits of concrete in the field.

It was not worth photographing in my opinion,

as we couldn't be sure of the location in such a large field.

Ray said that nothing of the control tower remains."

 

"All in all, when you really look at it, there is still quite a bit of concrete runway & taxiway left intact at Imeson.

Unfortunately, with 'No Trespassing' signs posted everywhere, and painted on the concrete,

it was difficult to get back into some of the areas where I'm sure some really juicy bits of history wait to be uncovered.

We took a chance going into areas we probably shouldn't have, but on Sunday, most folks are elsewhere.

It was great being there, and I feel that I spent a Sunday doing something really interesting & worthwhile."

 

A 2003 photo by John Deffes of unidentified marking within the concrete of the former Runway 23.

Is "10 16 62" a date - referring to what?

 

The site of Imeson Field is located southeast of the intersection of North Main Street & Busch Drive.

 

See also: http://celebrate2000.cjonline.com/stories/072699/his_jax26.shtml

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Cecil Field NAS (VQQ), Jacksonville, FL

30.22 North / 81.88 West (West of Jacksonville, FL)

A WW2-era view of Cecil Field, showing the original circular landing mat (National Archives photo).

 

Cecil Field was originally built in 1941 as an auxiliary training base for nearby Jacksonville NAS.

The original WW2-era airfield consisted of three asphalt runways,

with a large asphalt circular landing mat in the middle.

A rectangular concrete ramp at the northern end of the airfield had several hangars,

and a large number of buildings were constructed adjacent to the northern edge of the airfield.

 

Cecil Field & several other Navy satellite airfields,

as depicted on the February 1945 Jacksonville Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

Cecil Field was closed by the Navy in 1945 as part of the post-WW2 demobilization,

but then was reopened in 1948.

 

A January 6 1952 US Government aerial photo of Cecil Field, with the new runways under construction

(courtesy of the FL DOT, via Brian Rehwinkel).

 

In 1952, Cecil Field was designated as one of the Navy's new Master Jet Bases,

which set the stage for significant expansion.

The relatively short WW2-era runways were replaced by a new layout of four much longer concrete runways.

The new runways were not built directly over the WW2-era airfield,

but were constructed slightly to the east.

As seen in the above aerial photos,

during the transition period while the new runways were being built to the east,

only one of the WW2-era runways was still being used (the north/south runways).

 

A closeup of the large number of aircraft on Cecil's ramp, from the January 6 1952 US Government aerial photo

(courtesy of the FL DOT, via Brian Rehwinkel).

 

The 1959 Jeppesen Airway Manual (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

depicted Cecil Field after its reconstruction, having four 8,000' paved runways.

 

Cecil Field eventually served as the home base

for the all of the Navy's Atlantic Fleet S-3 Viking & F/A-18 Hornet aircraft.

 

Aerial photo of Cecil while it was still an active Navy airfield.

 

USGS aerial photo, circa 1990s.

 

In 1993, Cecil Field was placed on the Base Closure list,

which started it along the road toward closure as a military airfield.

 

The author of this web site worked at Cecil Field in 1996 as an engineer for Hughes Aircraft,

completing an upgrade of the F/A-18 Weapons Tactics Trainers (dome flight simulators).

 

Cecil Field was closed by the Navy in 1999.

 

Cecil Field has four runways, the longest of which, at 12,500',

is one of the longest runways in Florida.

 

The exterior of Building 832, which previously held four Hughes F/A-18 Weapons Tactics Trainers (full-dome flight simulators).

As of 2002, the building sat idle, but the Florida National Guard reportedly hopes to reuse it for some of their flight simulators.

Photo by Chris Reilly, 2002.

 

Hangar 67, previously home to Light Attack Wing One, and A-7 squadrons VA-46 & VA-72.

It was later used by Strike Fighter Wing Atlantic and F/A-18 squadron VFA-81.

As of 2002, the hangars is used by Boeing for F/A-18 & C-130 overhaul work.

Photo by Chris Reilly, 2002.

 

Interior of Building 1820, the former hangar of VFA-106, the Gladiators.

As of 2002, it was reused by Boeing to perform maintenance/upgrade work on F/A-18s.

This hangar, built in the early 1980s, is still in pristine condition, as it is the newest one on the base.

Photo by Chris Reilly, 2002.

 

The local government is attempting to redevelop Cecil Field for commercial aviation purposes.

 

In 2003, Brazilian aircraft manufacturing company Embraer

announced that it planned to establish an aircraft factory at Cecil Field.

 

John Deffes reported in 2003, "I was just out there [Cecil Field] a couple of weeks ago.

The city has now torn down all of the barracks, most buildings - like the convenience store / gas station.

Also public works buildings are now gone. It is unbelievable."

 

Jeroen Borgmeyer reported in 2004,

"I just read an article in the RNLAF(Royal Netherlands Air Force) periodical about NAS Cecil Field.

The RNLAF is currently using Cecil Field as the base for testing night vision equipment on their F-16s.

One of the things mentioned was how fast the F-16s tires wear (2x faster than back home)

because of the dust on the runway.

Along with other FOD (foreign object damage) being sucked in by the intake,

requiring the runway to be swept clean more often.

It also mentioned US Navy T-45s still making mock carrier landings once every few months."

 

..

 

John Deffes's tribute to Cecil Field was published in the Florida Times Union in 2003:

"When I think about Cecil Field closing, I get pretty emotional.

I have been sitting here trying to think of why.

Why get emotional over a Navy base?

I mean, I wasn't even stationed there while on active duty.

I was 10 miles away at NAS Jacksonville.

Is it just another base - a piece of real estate on Jacksonville's Westside?

I suppose, that to someone who has never served in the Navy,

Cecil is just a piece of property that the government & the Navy graded & prepared,

putting up an odd assortment of buildings & hangars & so forth.

But Cecil is more, much more."

 

"Lest you think I have no emotional attachment to Cecil, think again.

I am currently a DOD civilian working for NADEP Jacksonville.

I have been stationed at Cecil for NADEP several times over the last decade,

as NADEP has maintained a small team there at the Navy's convenience.

So I know Cecil. Not only that, but I live on the Westside.

So I hear the jets at night as I go to sleep. Their afterburner takeoffs serenade me to sleep."

 

"It's really about blood & death, and life & living. Lives & blood.

Cecil's history is written in both.

I still remember the time an A-7 & an S-3 collided on the runway.

Three people gave their blood & their lives that day.

I'll never forget the time when a young Marine aviator gave his life at Cecil's outlying field, Whitehouse,

when his jet flipped over & he didn't get out.

And who could forget the fact that the first casualty of the Gulf war - LCdr. Scott Speicher,

last touched U.S. soil at Cecil Field?

These are just a few.

So many others have given their lives at Cecil.

Not only that, but also many others like Mr. Speicher have last touched the soil of this country at Cecil.

How do you close the book on that?"

 

"What about the maintainers? How many guys lost a finger at Cecil?

How many cut themselves & bled on Cecil's ground?

Certainly you remember the terrible accident aboard U.S.S Forrestal?

How many maintainers from Cecil were on Forrestal's flight deck that awful day over 30 years ago?

I bet more than one gave his life that day.

I know that somewhere in Cecil's 50 plus years of history,

a maintainer has given his life working on the jets there on the flight line.

Probably several lives have been given in the never-ending task of keeping Cecil's planes in the air.

Cecil Field's soil is soaked with the blood of America's sons & daughters."

 

"But as I said, it is not just about death & blood.

It is about life as well. How many marriages have been performed in Cecil's chapel?

A few hundred I'd bet. How many babies born in the base hospital?

How many good times, anniversaries, birthdays, Christmases, holidays,

and other happy occasions have been celebrated at Cecil?

How many husbands & fathers have come home to Cecil

after a long & difficult deployment to the waiting arms of wives & children?

A drive through the base housing will make you think of those things.

The Exchange is closed. The Commissary is closed. The Credit Union is closed.

All of it is deserted, empty."

 

"More than once at Cecil, the Navy has put on an airshow.

I mean a big affair, not just a few planes & some barrel rolls.

I am quite sure that we have had upwards of 150,000 people at some of the shows.

The base always just sparkled on those days.

You could see the pride in the faces of the Navy & Marine personnel

as they explained their aircraft & its weapons to the civilians.

More than that though, you could stand on the flight line & look at all those people

and know that this was as close as they were gonna get to something that you lived & breathed everyday.

That feeling of 'Yeah, it's great you're here, but when you go later today, we will still be here,

still on watch, still protecting the freedom you love so much.'

That is a good feeling.

It is a feeling that you know you earned through hard work & sweat,

knowing it is a special privilege to serve, to watch over other people's lives & property & freedom."

 

"I guess history will be the judge of whether or not it is right to close Cecil.

Personally, I don't think it is, but I am not in charge, and I don't often see the big picture.

I just know that driving around Cecil is sad.

As I said, it is about life & death. But more than that.

The finest men & women our country can produce have given their all at Cecil.

Then they have gone around the world & given their all to protect freedom

and to restore hope to people persecuted by ruthless dictators.

Then they have given their lives.

They can close it up, board it up, and hang a different sign out front,

but to me, it will always be United States Naval Air Station, Cecil Field."

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