Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields:

Southeastern North Carolina

© 2002, © 2014 by Paul Freeman. Revised 2/8/14.

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Please consider a financial contribution to support the continued growth & operation of this site.



Atlantic MCOLF (revised 12/26/12) - Burgaw Airport (revised 5/7/13) - Blue Bird MCEAF (revised 12/28/13) - Bogue MCALF (revised 2/4/12)

Camp Davis AAF / Hollyridge AAF / Camp Davis MCOLF (revised 6/3/11) - Fort Fisher Army Airfield (added 2/8/14)

Jacksonville Airport (revised 12/28/13) - Oak Grove MCOLF / Pollocksville MCAAF (revised 12/28/12)

Point of Marsh Target Airfield (revised 7/25/13) - White Oak Airport / Piney Green International Airport (revised 3/7/10)

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Fort Fisher Army Airfield, Fort Fisher, NC

34.97 North / 77.92 West (South of Wilmington, NC)

A 1/1/58 USGS aerial view of Fort Fisher Army Airfield.



Fort Fisher was a Civil War era Confederate fort along the Atlantic coast.



In late December 1940, Camp Davis was built several miles to the north as an Army anti-aircraft artillery training facility.

The Fort Fisher property was used as the main target range for Camp Davis and the installation was given the name Fort Fisher Army Air Field.

Because of the new range's prominence, it was deemed necessary to make the range a self-sustaining post.

This called for the construction of 48 frame buildings, 316 tent frames, showers and latrines, mess halls, warehouses,

radio and meteorological stations, a post exchange, photo lab, recreation hall, outdoor theater, guardhouse, infirmary, and an administration building.

In addition to these facilities, the site featured a 10,000-gallon water storage tank, a motor pool, a large parade ground, and 3 steel observation towers along the beach.



According to Thomas Page, “I think there were 8 anti-aircraft gun emplacements.”



One of the more prominent features of the range was a 2,500' unpaved runway.

From a historical standpoint it was unfortunate the runway was built right through a section of the earthworks for the fort's land face, known as Shepard's Battery.

The Army was well aware of the historical significance of the old fort, but the necessities of the war outweighed historic preservation.



In 1944 the anti-aircraft training facility was transferred to another base and Camp Davis & Fort Fisher AAF were closed.

At the time of its closure, Fort Fisher AAF had grown to include an 80-seat cafeteria, a 350-bed hospital and dental clinic, and covered an area of several hundred acres.



In 1955 a property to the north of the airfield became the site of Fort Firsher Air Force Station, an air defense radar installation.



The earliest depiction which has been located of the Fort Fisher runway was a 1/1/58 USGS aerial view.



The 1997 USGS aerial photo annotated by Thomas Page to show the location of the Fort Fisher runway.



A 1/3/13 aerial view looking north showed the outline of the Fort Fisher runway remained recognizable.



The site of Fort Fisher AAF is located north of the intersection of Fort Fisher Boulevard & Battle Acre Road.

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Burgaw Airport, Burgaw, NC

34.55 North / 77.95 West (Southeast of Raleigh, NC)

Burgaw Airport, as depicted on the 1945 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).



According to a document provided by Mark Hess,

The Burgaw Airport Commission was organized on 6/20/44, with Senator Roy Rowe, Chairman, J.R. Lewis, Secretary & Treasurer.

Members: J.F. Bardshaw, E.N. Pearsall, C.F. Mallard, Leon Corbett as Consulting Attorney.

The airport was inspected & opened for business 10/11/44.”



The earliest depiction which has been located of the Burgaw Airport

was on the 1945 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).

It depicted Burgaw as a commercial/municipal airport.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described Burgaw Airport

as a 76 acre irregularly-shaped property containing a single 2,200' sod NNW/SSE runway.

The field was not said to have any hangars, and to be owned & operated by private interests.



According to a document provided by Mark Hess,

Burgaw Airport “has developed into a Government School for training G.I.'s in aviation.”



According to Mark Hess, “The Airport hangar was off a distance from the highway, 1944 to 1970s.”



The last aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of the Burgaw Airport

was on the April 1946 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Jim Stanton).

It depicted Burgaw as a commercial/municipal airport.



Burgaw Airport was evidently closed (for reasons unknown) at some point between 1946-53,

as it was no longer depicted on the 1953 USGS topo map.



A 1979 photo of the former Burgaw Airport hangar (courtesy of Mark Hess).

According to the Pender County Library, “Budd Ramsey built the brick office beside it.

The airport closed in the 1970s.”



The 1981 USGS topo map no longer depicted the Burgaw Airport.



The 1993 & 1999 USGS aerial photos depicted the site of Burgaw Airport as an open farm field,

with the hangar having been possibly relocated to the southeast corner of the site.



A 2004 aerial photo showed that residential construction had covered the the southwest part of the former airfield.



A circa 2007-2010 photo (courtesy of Mark Hess) of the former Burgaw Airport hangar,

reused by the Nash Equipment company.



A 10/23/10 aerial view showed the majority of the former Burgaw Airport remaining an open farm field.

The former hangar was visible at the bottom-right, after having been possibly relocated.



The site of Burgaw Airport is located northeast of the intersection of Route 53 & Teabriar Street.

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Point of Marsh Target Airfield, Piney Island, NC

35 North / 76.47 West (East of Cherry Point MCAS, NC)

The Point of Marsh airfield was labeled simply as a “Landing Strip”

within the “Cherry Point U.S. Military Reservation (Point of Marsh Target Area)”

on the 1982 USGS topo map.



According to Ken Strayhorn, “Point of Marsh was originally built as a satellite airfield for Cherry Point during WWII,

when PV-1 Venturas & PV-2 Harpoons were used in the anti-submarine role.

It was also a training field for pilots to learn how to land on less-than-ideal surfaces, similar to the rough airfields then in use in the Pacific Theater,

and as an emergency landing field for pilots low on gas - there were many of these throughout eastern NC.”



No airfield at this location was depicted on the 1945 Sectional Aeronautical Chart nor the 1950 USGS topo map.



Ken continued, “I grew up at MCAS Cherry Point where my father was a career officer;

somehow he managed to be stationed there almost continuously from 1947 until he retired in 1973.

While his primary occupation was an aviator, you probably know that in the Marines everyone has 2 jobs -

his other job was with what was then known as Overhaul & Repair, and then as Naval Air Rework Facility, and then as Naval Depot.

Part of his duties included going out to places like Point of Marsh & other satellite airfields for a variety of reasons.

He often took me & my brother along with him, especially during the summer months when school was out.

These emergency fields were very popular in the 1960s for Boy Scout Jamborees.

Many were also used as drag strips for the hot rod crowd.”



No airfield at this location was depicted on the 1965 Sectional Aeronautical Chart.



Ken Strayhorn recalled, “You may find it incredible, but they were still in use in the late 1960s, even for aircraft as advanced as the F-4 Phantom.

It was considered something of a challenge for pilots of the F-4 to execute a touch-and-go on one of these rough strips.”



Ken continued, “By the mid-1960s, when I first visited Point of Marsh, it was only used as a training area.

All bombing & strafing activities had been moved to the Stumpy Point Bombing Range.

Point of Marsh was used for 'dry field' training & for units from nearby Camp Lejeune to practice raids on airfields.

Dad was then Executive Officer of Naval Air Rework Facility, and they would haul surplus airframes out to the field to be 'attacked' by the commandos.

The structures in the middle of the airfield were 'Hogan's Alley' - a common name for practice villages made of wood & packing crates for the commandos to attack.

At least, I have heard that term in use at several military bases & training camps.”



Ken continued, “The water-filled channels on either side of the strip -

and surrounding the circular training areas in more recent photos - are known locally as 'borrow ditches'.

Dirt is 'borrowed' from the ditch to build up roadways & in this case the landing strip.

The water also has the added purpose of preventing any fires from training from spreading to the surrounding land.”



Ken continued, “There used to be a guard shack on the road to the strip.

A shelf had been built around the inside wall of the shack, up next to the ceiling,

and on that shelf were a number of large glass jars (what we used to call pickle jars) filled with large venomous snakes, their mouths propped open with toothpicks.

It was sport for the guards to walk the strip in the morning & find these moccasins & eastern diamondbacks,

which had crawled up on the warm concrete during the night, and then they would freeze the snakes with a CO2 fire extinguisher.

They would put the snake in the jar & fill it with denatured alcohol as a preservative.

Each jar was had a label with the name of the man who had caught it along with the date & length of the snake.”



As of the 1980s, the Point of Marsh Target Area presumably served the needs for air-to-ground target practice for aircraft from nearby MCAS Cherry Point,

as well as military aircraft from the Norfolk area.



The earliest depiction which has been located of the Point of Marsh airfield was on the 1982 USGS topo map.

It depicted 2 large target circles on the north end of the island,

and a single 4,000' paved northwest/southeast runway in the center of the island, labeled simply as “Landing Strip”.

The overall site was labeled “Cherry Point U.S. Military Reservation (Point of Marsh Target Area)”.



The 1983 USGS topo map depicted the single northeast/southeast runway, labeled simply as “Landing Strip”.



The 1993 USGS aerial photo depicted several structures or containers on the center of the runway,

and what appeared to be several target aircraft on the southeast end of the runway.



A 2006 aerial photo showed what appeared to be several target items on the northwest end of the runway,

as well as several target aircraft on the southeast end of the runway.



A close-up from the 2006 aerial photo showed what appeared to be at least 4 tactical jet aircraft (specific type unidentified)

situated on the southeast end of the runway, presumably serving as targets.



A circa 2007 aerial view looking north at the southeastern end of the Point of March target airfield,

showing what appeared to be at least 3 tactical jet aircraft (or replicas)

situated on the southeast end of the runway, presumably serving as targets.



Thanks to Wendy Bissinger for pointing out this airfield.

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White Oak Airport / Piney Green International Airport, Jacksonville, NC

34.77 North / 77.35 West (North of Camp Lejune, NC)

White Oak Airport, as depicted on the 1977 USGS topo map.

Photo of the airport while open has not been located.



The date of construction of this small private airfield has not been determined.

No airfield at this location was depicted on Norfolk Sectional Charts from 1945, 1961, or 1965,

listed in the 1976 AOPA Airports USA Directory (according to Chris Kennedy),

or depicted on the November 1976 CG-21 World Aeronautical Chart (according to Chris Kennedy).

The earliest depiction of White Oak Airport which has been located was on the 1977 USGS topo map.

It depicted the field as having a single 2,400' unpaved north/south runway.

A single small building was depicted on the southeast side of the runway.



Richard Stockman recalled, “The White Oak / Piney Green Airport...

several of the planes from the Jacksonville airport ended up there when they closed [the original Jacksonville Airport].

The owners did not want to pay the high storage cost at the new Albert Ellis Airport & the fact that most of the owners lived in that area.

That field started out as a fueling point for crop dusters & just grew from that.

During the week someone was always at the office to man the radio for incoming flights

and Mr. Blake also had a radio at his house so a pilot could call ahead of time on the weekend & he would go to the field to help.

He also lived in Long Acres as I did so he wasn’t far from the field.

There was 2 of the Ercoupes at the field & I had about 15 hours between the two.”



Former Jacksonville resident Maxine Frisbee recalled of White Oak Airport,

"It was open in the 1970s & was a private airstrip.

It was located off of Piney Green Road behind White Oak High School."

 

The 1982 AOPA Airports USA Directory (courtesy of Ed Drury)

listed the field as a private airfield, humorously named “Piney Green International”.



Sheldon Daitch recalled, “White Oak & Piney Green International were indeed the same place.

I got my private rating at the John LeJeune Flying Club at New River Air Station mid-1970s.

I am not sure we ever called it White Oak,

and I suspect the term Piney Green International was more a joke than a real name for the place.

Piney Green Road is the road along the school.

I am almost sure we did some landings there.

Dr. Russell Barnes had a Bonanza based at the field. 'Doc' regularly flew out of field.

I remember one trip, maybe 1977, when I went with him up to RDU in the Bonanza.

Although the field was not lighted, it was used for night landings.

There were some reflectors on the approach end of the field, nearest Piney Green Road,

and maybe some more along the side & perhaps the end.

Perhaps I was too new to flying to figure a night landing & PGI might not be the most appropriate way to end a flight!”



Maxine Frisbee recalled of White Oak Airport,

"It closed in the early 1980s I believe not long after my cousin & a fellow pilot crashed & died there.

I believe that it was determined that the gas that was provided had the wrong mixture.

They gained enough altitude to get off the ground but crashed into one of the high school greenhouses."



White Oak Airport was still depicted on the 1991 USGS topo map,

even though it may have been closed by that point.



As seen in the 1993 USGS aerial photo, the White Oak Airport appeared to remain completely intact,

with the runway still clear, and what appeared to be a small building just southeast of the runway.



Maxine Frisbee reported in 2004, "I am sure that the old runway might be there

because it led out into tobacco fields that are still farmed today."



A 2007 aerial photo showed the site of White Oak Airport to remain completely intact,

with the runway still clear, and what appeared to be a small building just southeast of the runway.



A circa 2008-2010 aerial view looking north along the south end of the White Oak runway

shows the runway to remain clear, but the small building at the southeast end was apparently removed at some point between 2007-2010.



The site of White Oak Airport is located northeast of the intersection of Piney Green Road & Halltown Road.

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Jacksonville Airport, Jacksonville, NC

34.79 North / 77.4 West (North of Camp Lejune, NC)

Jacksonville Airport, as depicted on the April 1946 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



The original airport for the town of Jacksonville was located to the northeast of the town.

Jacksonville Airport was apparently built at some point between 1945-46

(like hundreds of other small airports across the U.S., in the post-WW2 airport boom),

as it was not depicted at all on the 1943 USGS topo map

nor on the 1945 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).

 The earliest depiction of the Jacksonville Airport which has been located

was on the April 1946 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It depicted Jacksonville as an auxiliary airfield.



The January 1956 Norfolk Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy)

depicted Jacksonville as a public-use airport.



Richard Stockman recalled, “The Jacksonville airfield, run by Allen Blake, was my airport.

I grew up about 1 mile from the airport through the woods to the southwest of the runway.

Mr. Blake had a son Chris & we spent many days at the airport.

I moved many planes from tiedown to the fuel pad to prep for flight or cleaning a plane just in from a trip before going to tiedown.

Some pilots preferred having their plane fueled before parking & some would wait till they were going someplace.

I would help the on-site mechanic with repairs from time to time. For doing this Mr. Blake would give me flying lessons.

For a time I would also go with friends from the airfield to go sky diving, I did 9 jumps (5 static, 4 free-fall),

I was truly too young to do this but my parents gave their blessing & things were overlooked for a time.

Weldon Simpson had a Cessna Skymaster which he would fly for the skydiving once in a while.

Most time we used a Cessna 172.

Dr. Barns had a Mooney, an M20F Exec. I remember it was 6 passenger & would really haul.

He sold that back to Mr. Blake & bought a Piper Aztec.

When Dr. Barns bought the plane he had to go to Raleigh & then fly it back to Jacksonville, I remember the trip well.

That was the first time I had been in a multi-engine private plane.

Now understand this took place from when I was the age of 13-16.

Things were a little more relaxed those days so it made for a wonderful learning experience.

I also remember Mr. Hurst, he also helped me a great deal.”



A circa 1956-59 photo (courtesy of Cheryl Nekos) of several planes in front of the house at Jacksonville Airport.



The earliest dated photo which has been located of the Jacksonville Airport was a 2/1/57 USGS aerial view.

It depicted the field as having a single northeast/southwest runway,

with a ramp & small building on the south side.



Cheryl Nekos recalled, “My Dad (Bill Scott) owned/rented the [Jacksonville] Airport in the early 1960s.

He ran Onslow Aviation out of the office there. He also worked for the NC State Forest Service & flew for them from there.

The house to the left of the hangar is where we lived.

We had a lot of visitors to Camp Lejeune fly into our airport because it was the only private airstrip in the area.”



The 1960 Jeppesen Airway Manual (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

depicted Jacksonville as having a single 2,800' Runway 4/22, of which the southwestern half was paved.

A ramp on the south side of the field had 3 small buildings (hangars?).

The airport was said to be unattended, and "closed to the public."



Richard Stockman recalled, “As for the pavement of 1,400' of the south end of the runway I do not remember that at all.

I spent many days with the tractor cutting the grass on the runway & parking area.

There was no real taxi way down the side.

There was enough room for two planes to be on the runway at the same time but it never happened to my knowledge.”



The 1961 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

depicted Jacksonville as a private field with a 2,800' unpaved runway.



The 1962 AOPA Airport Directory described Jacksonville Airport

as consisting of a single 2,800' Runway 4/22 (1,400' paved & 1,400' turf).

The operator was listed as the NC Department of Conservation & Development,

and the airport was listed as being "Closed to general public."



By 1965, the Jacksonville Airport was apparently open to the public,

as it was depicted as a public airport on the 1965 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss),

and the Aerodromes table on the chart did not include any mention about it being closed to the general public.



Steve Hurst recalled, “I came back from Vietnam in 1966 with 6 hours in my logbook.

Stationed at Camp Lejeune, I looked for a place to work on a Private License,

and I found the Jacksonville airport just outside of Camp.

The FBO was run by Allen Blake who was also the chief CFI,

he along with Major Britt & John Lamb were the instructors.

These 3 instructors all had years of experience & instruction was excellent.

I started flying an Aeronca 7AC for $5 / hour wet.

This & a Cessna 150 got me to a private license.

There was plenty of business from Camp Lejeune & the nearby bases of Camp Geiger & Cherry Point.

With a private license I started flying friends home on weekends.

When the word got out I was quickly running a ferry service

and soon had enough hours for a commercial license & the instrument rating that followed shortly.

Then I really was running a real ferry service.

There were 20,000 Marines on the base & I could get them home in a hurry.

Allen was a Mooney dealer & purchased 2 Mooney Alon A-2s to use as trainers.

I went for an instructor rating & was just starting to instruct when my enlistment was over.

The training & experience I got at the little Jacksonville airport was top-notch & served me well in later years.”



A March 1967 photo by Steve Hurst of his friend Ted Lunacek in one of the Alon A-2s on the Jacksonville Airport fueling ramp.

Steve observed, “The FBO office is to the left of the hangar. The inside of the office was wallpapered with student solo shirt cut-outs.”



Steve Hurst recalled, “Allen Blake retired about 1970.”



The 1971 Flight Guide (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) depicted Jacksonville Municipal Airport

as having a single unpaved 2,640' Runway 4/22,

with a small ramp at the southwest side of the field with several small buildings (hangars?).

The 1971 Flight Guide also depicted Jacksonville's new airport, Albert Ellis Field,

which had been built as a replacement several miles to the northwest of the town of Jacksonville.



The original Jacksonville Airport was evidently closed within the next year,

as it was no longer depicted at all (even as an abandoned airfield)

on the August 1972 Charlotte Sectional Chart (courtesy of Robert Brown).



The 1978 USGS topo map still depicted Jacksonville Airport,

but it had apparently already been abandoned for several years at that point.



The original Jacksonville Airport continued to be depicted on the 1978 & 1991 USGS topo maps,

quite a while after being abandoned.

 

As seen in the 1993 USGS aerial photo, the remains of the runway were still clearly apparent,

but a new road, Western Boulevard, had been built across the southwestern end of the former runway

(and right across the former ramp area, the outline of which is still barely visible).

No remnants of any former airfield buildings were still apparent.



A 2007 aerial view shows a starkly different scene compared to the 1993 aerial photo,

with several roads having been built over the site of the former airport,

erasing the traces of the former runway.





Steve Hurst observed in 2009, “Sadly a great little airport is no longer there, but the pilots trained there are still flying.”



The site of Jacksonville Airport is located east of the intersection of Western Boulevard & Gateway South,

northeast of the town of Jacksonville.

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Blue Bird Marine Corps Expeditionary Airfield, Duck Creek, NC

34.55 North / 77.32 West (Southeast of Jacksonville, NC)

A 5/2/82 USGS aerial view of the Blue Bird Airfield.



This small airfield on the property of Camp Lejune

is one of 31 Expeditionary Airfields operated by the Marine Corps.



The date of construction of Blue Bird EAF is unknown.

It may have been built at some point between 1970-82,

as the airfield is not depicted at all on the 1970 USGS topo map.



The earliest depiction which has been located of the Blue Bird Airfield was on a 5/2/82 USGS aerial view.

It depicted Blue Bird as having a single paved Runway 13/31.



The Blue Bird Airfield was labeled simply as “Landing Strip” on the 1991 USGS topo map.



The airfield at Blue Bird is not depicted at all on aeronautical charts,

and it is not listed in the Airport Facility Directory as an airfield or heliport.



As seen in the 1993 USGS aerial photo, the Blue Bird Airfield consisted of a single northwest/southeast runway,

along with a helipad on the east side.



In 1998 the Blue Bird EAF was rebuilt by members of the "Untouchables", Marine Wing Support Squadron 272,

as described in a article in the 9/16/98 issue of the Marines Digest.



According to Gunnery Sgt. John C. Jefferson, MWSS-272 EAF officer-in-charge,

given the nature of the operation & the work that had to be done,

this was one of the quickest & most successful airfield construction operations he has witnessed.

"We had to take up the existing EAF because the shoulders surrounding it have eroded in the past few years,

causing a hazard to landing aircraft," Jefferson said.

"Once all the mats were taken up, our engineers & heavy equipment (HE) sections built new dirt shoulders,

and then a new airfield was constructed."



TLZ Blue Bird is a vertical/short takeoff & landing (VSTOL) site

used by helicopter & AV-8 Harrier pilots for combat mission training.

The airfield at Blue Bird consists of a single 1,700' runway, composed of hundreds of interlocking aluminum mats.

A taxiway leads a 96' square vertical takeoff & landing pad.

The entire landing area has a total of 161,568 sq ft.

"The entire surface area was reworked about five years ago & is still in relatively good shape," Jefferson said.

"Only certain spots that laid under the old mats needed to be repaired for certification."



The Untouchables constructed their entire base camp,

relocated necessary equipment from New River to the TLZ, assessed work requirements,

and started disassembling the runway on the 1st day at the site.

The squadron's base camp was spread throughout a wooded area adjacent to the TLZ

and consisted of a small number of the all-to-familiar general purpose tents,

covered with camouflage netting which made it virtually invisible to an untrained eye.



The estimated time taken to complete the operation was 4 weeks.

The Untouchables completed the task in a mere 2 weeks.

"The troops deserve every bit of the credit for another successful operation,"

said Lt. Col. Danny Brush, MWSS-272 commanding officer.

"They came out here & broke their backs to meet the needs of the Corps."



A circa 2008-2010 aerial photo looking north at the Blue Bird airfield

showed a single runway, a single helipad, and one small building on the southwest side.



Blue Bird EAF is located on the northeast shore of Mile Hammock Bay, 1.5 miles south of Route 172,

less than a mile from the Atlantic Ocean.

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Camp Army Airfield / Hollyridge Army Airfield /

Camp Davis Marine Corps Outer Landing Field (14NC),

Holly Ridge, NC

34.52 North / 77.55 West (Southwest of Jacksonville, NC)

Camp Davis AAF, as depicted on the September 1943 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



Camp Davis was originally built in 1940 as an Army anti-aircraft artillery training facility.

It was an expansive facility, consisting of more than 3,000 buildings on 45,538 acres,

with access provided by newly-built railroad spurs leading into the camp.



No airfield was yet depicted at Camp Davis on the August 1942 14M Regional Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



Two 5,000' paved runways were built by the Army at Camp Davis at some point between 1942-43.



A list of airfields used by the U.S. Government listed the field as “Hollyridge AAF”,

and indicated usage started on 1/1/43.



The earliest depiction of Camp Davis AAF which has been located

was on the September 1943 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



The earliest photo which has been located of Camp Davis was a 9/27/43 aerial view looking east

from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted the field as having 2 paved runways, with dozens of dispersal parking spots,

and a large number of buildings along the road on the southeast side.



Camp Davis' Runway 5/23 was wider, and was intended for use by transports,

while Runway 18/36 was narrower, and intended for use by single-engine aircraft.

Most of the aircraft which operated from the Camp Davis runways were single-engine aircraft

which were used to tow targets for the anti-aircraft artillery units.



A grid of streets & a large number of buildings was depicted at Camp Davis on the 1943 USGS topo map,

but nothing of the airfield was depicted.



A WW2 era view looking east at Camp Davis, with the 2 runways at the left & center of the photo.

 

An undated (pre-1944) series of panoramic images of Camp Davis' cantonment area, undated (courtesy of Joe Benson).

 

Camp Davis & its WW2-era artillery firing ranges, as depicted on a 2003 Army Corps of Engineers diagram.



In 1944 the anti-aircraft training facility was transferred to another base,

and Camp Davis was closed by the Army.

 

"Camp Davis AAF" & its associated firing area,

as depicted on the April 1945 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described Camp Davis AAF

as a 3,200 acre irregularly-shaped property containing a 5,100' concrete north/south runway & a 4,500' asphalt northeast/southwest runway.

The field was said to have 2 wooden hangars, the largest measuring 121' x 96'.

Camp Davis was described as being owned by the U.S. Government, and operated by the Army Air Forces.



A list of airfields used by the U.S. Government indicated that usage of “Hollyridge AAF” ended on 8/31/45.



In 1945, a portion of the Camp Davis area that was formerly used by

the Army as the Coastal Artillery Anti-Aircraft Firing Range

(and is the location of the present-day town of Surf City) was transferred to the Navy.

The site was used by the Navy for the development & testing of early surface-to-air missiles,

under the name "Operation Bumblebee".



The Camp Davis airfield was no longer depicted at all

on the April 1946 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Jim Stanton).

 

In 1948, the Navy closed down missile operations at Camp Davis.

Camp Davis was declared surplus & was dismantled in the late 1940s for salvage & sale.

At that time the Navy apparently gave up the leases on the land

& it was returned to the original landowners.



Ironically, the 1948 USGS topo map depicted the extensive street grid along the southern part of Camp Davis,

but no airfield facilities were depicted at all.

 

In the words of Joe Benson, "I came to Jacksonville every year when school was out from about 1949-62.

Every year Camp Davis changed. As I think back, it was like a slow flickering film.

One year, everything was there. The next some buildings gone. The next, even more.

As the buildings went, the thing that started becoming the principal landmark was all the chimneys from the buildings.

For some reason, they never touched the brick chimneys even to this day, so to speak.

For years, they looked like brick trees, there were so many.

If you go in there now, you can still see many on the ground that were just eventually knocked over.

I guess others were finally stripped by people over time for the brick.

But I'll never forget that forest of chimneys for years.

There's probably enough chimney bricks left there to build a house if you wanted!"

 

In 1954, the U.S. Marine Corps took out a new lease for approximately 955 acres

on the former Camp Davis airfields & surrounding land from International Paper Company.

 

Camp Davis was still listed as a Navy facility on the 1965 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss),

but was still labeled "Closed".

It was described as having two 5,500' concrete runways.



The 1981 USGS topo map depicted the 2 runways at Camp Davis as “Abandoned Landing Strip”.



Howie Howe recalled a deployment to the Camp Davis airfield.

"In the early 1980's, my Marine Crops Reserve unit was activated for a weekend,

and put on Air Force transports.

We were flown from NAS South Weymouth, MA,

down to an abandoned airfield [Camp Davis MCOLF] adjacent to Camp Lejeune.

When we landed the runway was in very bad need of maintenance,

there were no standing structures,

and the air traffic control operations were done by radiomen using jeep mounted UHF radios.

I do remember seeing some overgrown foundations,

and that the road from the field out to Highway 17 was dirt."



Ken Roberts recalled, “Camp Davis AAF airfield... in the early 1980s we used to drag race our cars on that runway!

Everyone with a hot-rod in that corner of the state knew about 'Holly Ridge' as we called it.

The entire area was uncontrolled, access was never a problem.

We used to just drive out there, always a crowd on Saturdays & Sundays."



A 1986 close-up by Paul Cotrufo, looking east at the deck outline of an LPH helicopter carrier,

painted on the north/south runway at Camp Davis.



A May 1989 photo by T. Birrenkott of an Army AH-64A Apache helicopter returning to Camp Davis from an assault mission

during the joint services Exercise Solid Shield 89.



A May 1989 photo by Scott Stewart of Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters from the 101st Airborne Division

on the airfield at Camp Davis during the joint services exercise Solid Shield 89.

Also note the Marine UH-1N Iroquois helicopter passing overhead in the background.



A May 1989 photo by Scott Stewart of a C-130 Hercules from the 317th Tactical Air Wing lifting off from the runway at the Camp Davis airfield

carrying soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division at the conclusion of the joint services exercise Solid Shield 89.



A May 1989 DOD photo by Sgt. Birrenkott of 2 CH-47 helicopters hovering at Camp Davis

as they prepare to make an external lift of 2 sets of M-998 HMMWVs & 105mm towed howitzers during Operation Solid Shield '89.



A 1990 aerial view by Paul Cotrufo looking northeast along Camp Davis' northeast/southwest runway.

 

USGS 1996 aerial view.

 

Camp Davis has been used in recent years by the Marines as a satellite airfield

for helicopter units based at nearby New River MCAS.

The gate is located along the west side of NC Route 17, just North of Holly Ridge.

 

The airfield at Camp Davis currently consists of 2 paved 5,000' runways (5/23 & 18/36),

along with an extensive network of taxiways & parking ramps.

Runway 18/36 was being resurfaced with concrete in 1997,

possibly for use by the V-22s which would be based at nearby MCAS New River in increasing numbers over the next few years.

 

A 1997 photo by Paul Freeman of a CH-46E performing a practice low approach to Runway 5/23.

 

A 1997 photo by Paul Freeman of an MH-53E performing a practice low approach to Runway 5/23.

 

A 1997 photo by Paul Freeman of one of 2 derelict USN TA-4Js

which are still parked at end of parking ramps in between the 2 runways.

The TA-4J was previously used for external load operations by New River CH-53s.

According to Michael Montgomery (who worked on TA-4s at Kingsville),

this Skyhawk was previously assigned to TW-2 at NAS Kingsville, TX.



According to Glenn Diefenderfer, “The TA-4J at Camp Davis... I actually flew that plane.

I was an instructor in Kingsville, TX (VT-22), during the 1970s & flew about 1,800 hours in the TA-4Js.”

In 1998, Jamie Clabaugh was a Marine at Camp Lejune,

and he recalled coming across the TA-4J while on an exercise.

"I was in a reconnaissance unit & that day I had hiked from the main highway all the way to the far runway

which took a good 2 days through the swamp.

We were working on anti-terrorist training at the time

and our mission on that day was to watch a suspected terrorist training camp

that was located about 500 meters north of where that plane was located.

We had set up base camp right next door to that aircraft & got to know that plane quite well."



Even aircraft as large as a C-130 Hercules have occasionally landed at the Camp Davis runway in recent years.

Members of Company 4 run off a USAF C-130 Hercules at Camp Davis

during an Airfield Security, Convoy Operations, and Humanitarian Assistance Final Training Exercise in 1996.

DoD photo by Army Staff Sgt. M.A. Jones.



Peter Hantelman reported about the TA-4J pictured above at Camp Davis:

That A-4 appeared in the 'junkyard' at Defense Reutilization Management Office at MCAS Cherry Point in around summer 2001.

I drove past in several times a week, and recognize that particular hulk, plus its identification marks.

It sat there for about a year, before it disappeared.

There was a write-up about it in the base newspaper.

It was demilitarized, then shipped on a barge into the training areas east on base.

It sits at a mock-up runway, along with other targets for the Harrier pilots to practice bomb.”



A 2002 photo of a CH-46E at Camp Davis,

as Marine Wing Support Squadron-272 used the field to conduct pre-deployment training.

The purpose of this was to provide advanced training for the air base ground defense platoon

and a warm-up exercise for their upcoming deployment to Spain

 

Howie Howe reported in 2003, "It appears that the Marines have recently purchased a majority of Camp Davis

and may now be referring to it as the Greater Sandy Run Training Area."



A March 30, 2006 aerial view of 2 A-4s parked on ramps in between the 2 Camp Davis runways.

An aerial photo from only 3 months later appeared to show that both aircraft had been removed.



A winter 2006 aerial view showed a dusting of snow around the Camp Davis runways.



A circa 2008-2010 aerial view looking north along Camp Davis' Runway 36

showed 2 small buildings along the southwest side of the runway.



See also: http://www.hnd.usace.army.mil/OEW/factshts/factshts/cmpdavis.pdf

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Atlantic Marine Corps Outer Landing Field (12NC),

Atlantic, NC

34.88 North / 76.35 West (Northeast of Morehead City, NC)

A 1942 photo of pilots in front of an SBD Dauntless in front of the Atlantic Field control tower (courtesy of Homer Davis, via Sam Taylor).



Atlantic was built during WW2 as a satellite airfield for MCAS Cherry Point.

The Navy acquired 1,470 acres of land in early 1942,

and construction commenced later that year.



No airfield was yet depicted at Atlantic on the August 1942 14M Regional Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



The earliest depiction of the Atlantic airfield which has been located

was a 1942 photo of pilots in front of an SBD Dauntless

in front of the Atlantic Field control tower (courtesy of Homer Davis, via Sam Taylor).



Two 1942 photos of SBD Dauntlesses at Atlantic Field (courtesy of Homer Davis, via Sam Taylor).





An undated (WW2-era) USMC photo of the control tower & operations building at Atlantic

with several SBD Dauntlesses in the background.



The earliest aeronautical chart depiction of the Atlantic airfield which has been located

was on the September 1943 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It labeled the field as “Atlantic (Navy)”.



A December 1943 photos of the Atlantic Field control tower (courtesy of Homer Davis, via Sam Taylor).

Note the tower cab on top, which was not yet present in the earlier photo.



Atlantic Field was initially planned to have 2 runways,

but work began on a 3rd runway in 1943.

 

The 1st aircraft reportedly arrived at Atlantic in 1943 [but that is contradicted by the 1942 photos above],

the Douglas SDB Dauntless dive bombers of VMSB-341,

followed shortly by VMSB-342.

Atlantic was commissioned as a Marine Corps Auxiliary Airfield in 1943.

A total complement of 36 aircraft was present on the base in 1943 - 35 SBDs & one J2F Duck amphibian.

A hangar was completed in late 1943, as well as barracks, workshops & other buildings.

 

Several other Marine dive bombing squadrons were assigned to Atlantic during 1943.

In 1944 a detachment of Air Warning Squadron AWS-16 arrived,

as well as VMSB-934 with new Curtiss SB2C Helldivers.



A 1944 aerial view looking southwest at Atlantic MCOLF (National Archives photo).

 

By 1945, aviation activity at Atlantic declined to a minimal level.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described Atlantic MCAAF

as a 1,446 acre irregularly-shaped property containing 3 asphalt 3,500 runways.

The field was said to have a single hangar with a 78' x 20' door,

to be owned by the U.S. Government, and operated by the Marine Corps.



By the end of the war, the facilities at Atlantic consisted of three 3,500' asphalt runways,

a hangar, control tower & operations building, and barracks for a total of 815 personnel.

The total cost of the station was $1.26 million.

 

"Atlantic (Navy)", as depicted on the April 1945 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

The 1949 USGS topo map depicted "Atlantic Field" having 3 paved runways.



Atlantic was apparently abandoned at some point between 1956-65,

as it was labeled "OLF Atlantic (Navy) (Closed)" on the 1965 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).

The Aerodromes table on the chart described the field as having 3 asphalt runways,

with the longest being 3,500'.

 

Although it has remained officially closed as an airfield,

Atlantic has been used occasionally in subsequent years by the Marine Corps

as a satellite airfield for aircraft & helicopters from MCAS New River & MCAS Cherry Point.



According to Samuel Taylor, in “the early 1980's the Air Force Reserves landed a C-130” on the Atlantic runway.

 

As of the 1993 USGS aerial photo,

the remains of 3 paved runways still exist (01/19, 05/23 & 10/28), each 3,500 ft.

 

Atlantic is still used occasionally (as of 2003) for exercises by New River helicopters.



A circa 2000-2005 USGS aerial photo showed the Atlantic airfield to remain completely intact,

and with some signs of recent use – including a number of trailers or other ground vehicles stored on the ramp.



A close-up from a circa 2000-2005 USGS aerial photo showed what appeared to be 3 A-4 Skyhawks on a ramp at Atlantic.



A 12/19/07 photo by Sam Taylor of a Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey from nearby MCAS New River

which was temporarily grounded at MCOLF Atlantic.

Sam reported, “There were 3 V-22s here on a night training mission.

This one lost oil from a pump around the starboard engine.

It was repaired & left the next day.

We have just cleared 2 massive landing zones for the V-22 here.

There is a military construction job to build a new invasion city here.

This old WW2field is going to be a hot spot for them to train.”



Sam Taylor reported in 2007, “MCOLF Atlantic is the Mid-Atlantic Electronic Warfare Range.

We have about 65 people here. I work in the Supply Department.”



A 12/19/07 photo by Sam Taylor of a Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey from nearby MCAS New River

which was temporarily grounded at MCOLF Atlantic.



A circa 2008-2010 aerial view looking north at the southwest corner of the Atlantic airfield,

showing 4 helicopter landing spots painted on Runway 5.



A circa 2008-2010 aerial view looking east at the Atlantic ramp, showing one F-4 Phantom, 2 A-7 Corsairs, and one A-4 Skyhawk.



A 12/7/10 Marine Corps photo by Richard McCumber of a Bell/Boeing MV-22B of VMM-264 participating in air delivery training on Camp Davis.

The Marines of Combat Logistics Regiment 27 worked alongside VMM-264, Marine Air Group-26

to provide landing support to II Marine Expeditionary Force operations during pre-deployment training.



A 6/1/11 photo by Sam Taylor of a Marine Corps Bell UH-1N Huey which made a precautionary landing at MCOLF Atlantic.

Sam reported, “This UH-1 had mechanical trouble yesterday afternoon. It is still here. I think it is from New River MCAS.”

Note the 70mm rocket pod mounted on the right pylon.



A May 2012 photo by Sam Taylor of a rare sight in NC: a Soviet-designed Mi-8 Hip helicopter on the MCOLF Atlantic runway.



A May 2012 photo by Sam Taylor of a CASA C-295 on the MCOLF Atlantic runway.

Sam remarked, “This was the first [fixed-wing] airplane to land on the runways since the early 1980s.”



Samuel Taylor reported in 2012, “They are building a combat live fire village & various buildings and towers, associated with [the V-22].

There are 2 large landing zones completed for the V-22 assaults.”



See also:

"US Marine Corps Air Stations of WW2", by Mel Shettle.

www.airnav.com/airports/12NC

http://www.insiders.com/crystalcoast/main-military.htm

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Oak Grove Marine Corps Outer Landing Field / Pollocksville Marine Corps Auxiliary Air Facility (13NC),

Pollocksville, NC

35 North / 77.25 West (Northeast of Jacksonville, NC)

A 1943 National Archives aerial view looking east at Oak Grove.



Oak Grove was selected in 1942 as the site of one of several satellite airfields to be built for the use of MCAS Cherry Point.



No airfield was yet depicted at Oak Grove

on the August 1942 14M Regional Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



A total of 976 acres were purchased, and construction began at the end of 1942.

An airfield with 3 asphalt 4,000' runways was constructed,

along with accommodations for a total of 1,180 personnel.

 

Oak Grove was opened in 1943 as an Outlying Landing Field for Cherry Point.

The 1st squadron to come aboard was VMF-321,

and the base was commissioned as a Marine Corps Auxiliary Air Field in 1943.



The earliest depiction which has been located of Oak Grove was a 1943 National Archives aerial view.

It depicted the field as having 3 asphalt runways.



The earliest chart depiction which has been located of the Oak Grove airfield

was on the September 1943 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It labeled the field as "Oak Grove (Navy)".



A massive "Tiny Tim" rocket being launched from an SB2C Helldiver.

 

Marine Air Group 51 was commissioned at Oak Grove in early 1944.

It eventually consisted of a total of 4 fighter squadrons.

MAG-51 had been assigned the mission of using the newly-developed "Tiny Tim" unguided aerial rocket

to neutralize V-1 "Buzz Bomb" launch sites in Europe.

The Tiny Tim was a massive weapon, 11.75" in diameter,

but problems with its launching from fighters of the era had not yet been fully resolved.

As it turned out, the V-1 launch sites in Europe had been overrun by allied troops before MAG-51 was ready to deploy.

 

Additional facilities construction took place at Oak Grove in 1944.

Additional flying units were based at Oak Grove, including units equipped with the F4U Corsair,

SBD Dauntless, and SB2C Helldiver.



A 12/9/44 aerial view looking west at “Pollocksville MCAAF”

from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock)

depicted the field as having 3 paved runways, with a number of aircraft, vehicles, or buildings on the north side.



"Oak Grove (Navy)" was still depicted as an active airfield

on the April 1945 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described “Pollocksville MCAAF”

as a 1,068 acre triangular property containing 3 asphalt 4,000' runways.

The field was said to have a single hangar with a 78' x 20' door.

Pollocksville was described as being owned by the U.S. Government, and operated by the Marine Corps.



After WW2, Oak Grove was under consideration by the Marine Corps to be made a permanent station,

but it was downgraded to become an Outlying Field of Cherry Point once again in 1947.

 

It continued to see occasional use by helicopters from New River.

The Aerodromes table on the 1965 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss)

described the field as having 3 asphalt runways,

with the longest being 4,000'.

It described Oak Grove as a "HOLF to MCAS New River", but also listed its status as "Clsd."



Neal Davis recalled, “I grew up in New Bern, NC

and remember well that back in the mid-1960s Oak Grove was abandoned (locked up, no activity).

A bunch of guys broke the gate open & for the next couple of months we would gather there on Sundays to drag race on the runways.

It became so popular that vendors would set up refreshment stands.

We would race 2, 3 and 4-wide... whatever.

It was complete chaos & therefore extremely popular.

Eventually the brass found out about us & raised tee-total hell.

The gate was rebuilt & very stern warnings were posted. That was the end of that.”



Oak Grove, as depicted on the 1965 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).

 

"HOLF Oak Grove (Navy)" was still depicted as an active airfield

on the 1972 Charlotte Sectional Chart (courtesy of Robert Brown).



David Brunger recalled, “I served in the United States Army, 27th Engineer Battalion (Combat/Airborne) stationed at Ft. Bragg.

In March 1973, 2nd platoon of Bravo Company, of which I was a member, was sent to Oak Grove

to conduct reconnaissance, surveying, assessment, and initial preparations for the utilization of this inactive airstrip for 'war games'.

I say inactive, however a Marine was living there, with his family, in the house close to the road.

He stated that he was assigned here to watch the property, and keep the civilians out.”



David continued, “Our task was the preparation for, and the construction of a runway over the top of the north/south portion of the concrete runway.

And for the maintenance of the portions of the runways not to be utilized as active landing strip.

The runway we constructed was made utilizing XM-18 Landing Mats.

All of the crates where marked destination: Republic of South Vietnam.

Trees were cut, including some on the south side of the river, on civilian property, ditches cleaned, etc.

The mission was accomplished, and we saw Marines, Army, Air force, and Navel personnel and equipment using this airfield.

In late July, or early August, we (2nd Platoon) dismantled the runway, packed up, and headed back to Ft. Bragg.

I thoroughly enjoyed the time I spent there.

I have some photographs of our bivouac area, construction of the airstrip, and of men & equipment, including helicopters & C-130s.

Including some fighter jets that did mock bombing & strafing of us.”



The airfield was depicted as "HOLF Oak Grove (Navy) (Closed)"

on the November 1976 CG-21 World Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

Ed Hofstrand recalled, " I was stationed there in the late 1970s

when the base was our 'home' to a group of 80 Marines

from the MOOSE program (Maintenance of Out Of Service Equipment) - a motor pool.

Though we regularly had air visitors from Harriers, Cobra and Huey helicopters

as well as H-46 Sea Knights (the twin bladed helicopters).

It began in 1977. I came to the base in August of 1978.

The machine shed on the north end of the field was a building we used.

The large open area was where we stored the vehicles.

We used to do convoys on the runway every month on equipment.

It sounds like the program disbanded in the early 1980s."

 

According to Joe Benson, Oak Grove was also used by AV-8 Harriers from MCAS Cherry Point.

"They were going to do a major expansion there for Harrier operations

but the community didn't want the noise or the bucks, I guess."



The 1982 USGS topo map depicted “Oak Grove Airfield” as having 3 paved runways, taxiways, a ramp, and 4 small buildings.

 

 

As of the 1993 USGS aerial photo, the airfield consisted of 3 paved 4,000' runways (18/36, 5/23 & 9/27),

taxiways, and a ramp at the northeast corner.

All of the WW2-era buildings had been removed.

 

A 1997 aerial photo by Paul Cotrufo looking southwest at Oak Grove.

 

A 1997 aerial photo by Paul Cotrufo looking northeast at Oak Grove.

 

A 1997 photo by Paul Cotrufo of a Grumman F-11 Tiger (BuNo. 138639),

which sits where it was dropped in the woods, one mile west-southwest of Oak Grove.

Paul explained, “It was being airlifted to a museum in SC & something went wrong with the helicopter

and they dropped the plane to keep from crashing.

I have noticed 3 F-11 Tigers in Eastern NC; all were from VT-26, Chase Field, TX."



An October 2002 photo by Alicia Anderson of a Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion landing at Oak Grove Field

during a bare base field refueling exercise conducted with Marines assigned to Marine Wing Support Squadron 274.

 

As of 2003, Oak Grove is still listed in the Airport Facility Directory as an active military field.

It is used occasionally as a Helicopter Outlying Landing Field by units from nearby New River MCAS.



Pollocksville Mayor Jay Bender reported of Oak Grove in 2005,

Although the base is currently 'technically' under the control of MCAS Cherry Point,

it is used primarily by MCAS-New River for practice with the new Osprey [MV-22].

So there is activity on the base almost all the time.”



A 11/25/08 photo of a Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey conducting training at Oak Grove.

 

See also: "US Marine Corps Air Stations of WW2", by Mel Shettle.

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Bogue Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field (NJM),

Emerald Isle, NC

34.69 North / 77 West (Southwest of Morehead City, NC)

“Bogue Sound (Navy)”, as depicted on the September 1943 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



The Navy purchased 573 acres of land in 1942 for an auxiliary airfield for the use of MCAS Cherry Point.



No airfield was yet depicted at Bogue

on the August 1942 14M Regional Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) nor the 1942 USGS topo map.

The earliest depiction of the Bogue airfield which has been located

was on the September 1943 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It labeled the field as “Bogue Sound (Navy)”.



Three 4,000' runways were built,

along with facilities intended to support 2 squadrons with a total of 45 aircraft.

Initial accommodations were constructed for a total of 1,050 personnel.



A 1943 aerial view of Bogue (National Archives photo).



During WW2, Bogue was used almost exclusively by Marine Corps VMSB dive-bombing squadrons.

The 1st squadron, VMSB-311, moved to Bogue from New River in 1943, equipped with the SBD Dauntless.

By late 1943, Marine Air Group 33 was located at Bogue.

 

To support the training of the resident dive-bombing squadrons,

specialized training facilities were established in the surrounding area.

Dive-bombing circle targets were constructed on nearby islands,

and vertical targets were built for low-level bombing practice.

A maneuvering target boat was also used on the Neuse River to practice attacks on shipping.

 

MAG-33 transferred to Eagle Mountain Lake, TX in 1944,

and MAG-93 was commissioned at Oak Grove in the same year.

By that point, Marine Corps dive-bombing squadrons were transitioning to the Curtiss SB2C Helldiver.

 

A J2F Duck amphibian was assigned to Bogue for the rescue of downed flyers,

but it was proven unsuitable for open-sea landings.



A 12/6/44 aerial view looking east at Bogue MCAAF from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock)

depicted the field as having 3 paved runways.



"Bogue (Navy)", as depicted on the April 1945 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described Bogue MCAAF

as a 844 acre irregularly-shaped property containing 3 asphalt 3,500 runways.

The field was said to have a single wooden hangar with a 78' x 20' door,

to be owned by the U.S. Government, and operated by the Marine Corps.



Bogue was decommissioned at the end of WW2,

and became an Outlying Field of Cherry Point.



"Bogue Airfield", as depicted on the 1952 USGS topo map.



The Marines' 1st Short Airfield for Tactical Support (SATS) system was installed at Bogue in 1958.

It was a deployable catapult & arresting system,

intended to permit jet aircraft to operate from short expeditionary airfields.

 

The airfield was labeled "OLF Bogue (Navy) (Closed)" on the 1965 Norfolk Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).

The Aerodromes table on the chart described the field as having 3 asphalt runways,

with the longest being 4,000'.

 

At some point between 1965-76,

Bogue was reopened by the Marine Corps as a satellite airfield for aircraft & helicopters

from MCAS New River & MCAS Cherry Point.

"MCALF Bogue" was once again depicted as an active airfield

on the November 1976 CG-21 World Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



An October 1978 air-to-air photo by Sgt. McCutchin of a Marine Corps AV-8A Harrier from VMAL-231

taking off from the Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field Bogue.



A May 1979 photo by Cpl. Burnett of a Marine Corps A-4M Skyhawk from Marine Light Attack Squadron 331

waiting to takeoff at Bogue Field as another A-4M prepares to land.



USGS aerial photo 1993.

 

As of 2003, Bogue is still actively used as a satellite airfield.

One runway is still maintained (5/23, 4,010 ft long),

along with the painted outline of the deck of an LHA amphibious assault ship,

used for carrier landing practice.

The remains of 2 other runways still exist.

The Airport Facility Directory includes the remark, "Runway 18 utilized for catapults only."



A circa 2000-2005 USGS aerial photo looking northeast along Bogue's Runway 5.

Note the helicopter carrier markings on the runway & taxiway.



A July 20, 2006 DOD photo by Sarayuth Pinthong,

showing Marines from Combat Logistics Company, 21st Aerial Port Operations Group, MCAS Cherry Point

preparing to offload 2 tactical vehicles from the C-17 after landing at Bogue MCALF in support of exercise Iron Thunder.

Iron Thunder was a 4-day, large-force exercise consisting of more than 100 U.S., British, and NATO aircraft

simulating a full-scale invasion of the North Carolina coast.



A circa 2008-2010 aerial view looking north along Bogue's Runway 5,

showing the helicopter carrier markings painted on the taxiway & the aircraft carrier markings painted on the runway.



See also:

"US Marine Corps Air Stations of WW2", by Mel Shettle.

http://www.insiders.com/crystalcoast/main-military.htm

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