Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields:

New York, Long Island, Eastern Suffolk County

© 2002, © 2019 by Paul Freeman. Revised 7/27/19.

This site covers airfields in all 50 states: Click here for the site's main menu.

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Coram Airport (revised 5/17/17) - Grumman Peconic River Airfield / Calverton Executive Airpark (added 7/27/19)

Sayville Airport (revised 6/20/19) - New Sayville Airport (revised 5/17/17)

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Grumman Peconic River Airfield / Calverton Executive Airpark (CTO), Calverton, NY

40.92, -72.79 (East of Bethpage, NY)

Grumman Peconic River" Airfield, as depicted on the July 1954 NY Sectional Chart.



Peconic River Airfield was built as the factory airfield for Grumman's Calverton factory.

Their was was designated the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Calverton (NWIRP),

a government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) facility.



According to Wikipedia, “About 1950, the United States Navy purchased about 6,000 acres on the Peconic River.

Among the properties purchased was a mansion belonging to the grandson of F.W. Woolworth.”



Peconic River's 2 paved runways (14/32 & 5/23) were completed in 1953.



Peconic River Airfield was not yet depicted on the January 1954 NY Sectional Chart.



The earliest depiction which has been located of the Peconic River Airfield was on the July 1954 NY Sectional Chart.

It depicted Grumman Peconic River Airfield as having a 10,000' paved runway & a control tower.



The Assembly Building (Plant 6) was accepted for Grumman operation in 1954, and production commenced that same year.

Also in 1954, Hangar #4 was occupied by the Flight Test Department, and Hangar #1 was occupied.

In 1956, construction was completed on the Firing-In area (gun butts) & the Engine Test House.



The earliest photo which has been located of the Peconic River Airfield was a 6/10/57 USGS aerial view.

It depicted the field as having 2 paved runways, taxiways, ramps, hangars, and factory buildings.



A closeup of the 6/10/57 USGS aerial view of the Peconic River Airfield showed a unidentified twin-engine aircraft on the northwest ramp.






The 1957 USGS topo map depicted “Grumman Airport” as having 2 paved runways, taxiways, ramps, hangars, and factory buildings.



The Rotodome Test Area (used for E-2 Hawkeye radar development) was completed in 1961.



The 1962 AOPA Airport Directory described Peconic River Airfield as having 2 paved runways.



Grumman's Calverton facility eventually was the birthplace of many famous Grumman aircraft, including the F-14 Tomcat, A-6 Intruder, EA-6B Prowler, and E-2 Hawkeye.

The Grumman site consisted of Plant 6, where final assembly of F-14s, A-6s, EA-6Bs, and E-2Cs took place, and the Flight Test Plant 7.



In 1965, New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller proposed converting the Peconic River Airfield into the 4th New York City metropolitan airport joining Laguardia, JFK, and Newark Airport.

The proposal was abandoned following opposition from both Grumman & local residents.



A 3/29/66 USGS aerial view depicted the Peconic River Airfield with the same runway configuration as seen in 1957.



A closeup of the 3/29/66 USGS aerial view of the Peconic River Airfield showed 13 aircraft (S-2 Trackers & A-6 Intruders?) on the northeast ramp.



During the Space Race, Grumman built a mockup of the lunar surface at Calverton to test its proposed Mobility Laboratory (MOLAB) vehicle,

and many of the lunar astronauts visited the plant.



A circa 1969 photo of prototypes of the Grumman Mobility Laboratory (MOLAB) & Lunar Excursion Module on a simulated lunar surface at Grumman's Calverton plant at Calverton.



A 1973 or later photo of Grumman A-6A Intruder BuNo 155632 on the Grumman Calverton assembly line during its upgrade to the A-6E configuration.



A 1974 photo of newly-built F-14 Tomcats & an A-6 Intruder outside Grumman's Calverton plant.



A 4/8/76 photo of F-14A Tomcat 160305 outside the Grumman Calverton plant just prior to its delivery to the Imperial Iranian Air Force.



A 1980 photo of the Grumman Calverton F-14 Tomcat production line.



A 1980 photo of Grumman F-14 Tomcats & EA-6B Prowlers on the Calverton assembly line.



A 1990s aerial view (courtesy of Brett) of Grumman's F-14B Super Tomcat prototype overflying its birthplace, the Calverton plant.



A 1994 aerial view of the Peconic River Airfield, showing both runways still marked as active.



Grumman merged with Northrop Corporation in 1994, forming Northrop Grumman Corporation, and the new firm eliminated almost all operations on Long Island.

The sole remaining Grumman aircraft production line (for the E-2 Hawkeye) was consolidated to St. Augustine, FL.

Grumman vacated the Calverton site on 2/14/96.



The NTSB leased a Calverton hangar at Calverton & used it to reassemble the wreckage of the TWA Flight 800 Boeing 747,

which had exploded on departure from JFK Airport on 7/17/96.

The reconstruction of the 93' section of the forward fuselage of TWA Flight 800 took place over the winter & spring of 1997 in a Calverton hangar.

The reconstruction of the Boeing 747 fuselage included the center wing fuel tank, the heaviest structural part of the plane.

It weighed 60,000 pounds, and consisted of almost 1,600 pieces, including more than 700 from the center wing fuel tank.



A 1997 photo of the reassembled wreckage of the TWA Flight 800 Boeing 747 inside a Calverton hangar.



The Peconic River Airfield property was turned over by the Navy to the Town of Riverhead in 1998.

A group named the Grumman Peconic Airfield Alliance was successful in convincing the local government to reopen the airfield.

It was reestablished as a private airfield for the use of a skydiving operation, Skydive Long Island,

which flew out of Calverton with a Twin Otter.



In the 1998 transactions, East End Aircraft Long Island Corporation was given 10 acres on Highway 25 intended to be developed into the Grumman Memorial Park & Aerospace Museum.



A circa 1990s-2000s photo of the Grumman Calverton plant & control tower.



Tom Kramer reported from an overflight in 2003 that "the eastern runway (14-32) has the white x's removed (blacked over) & new runway numbers painted on each end.

No displaced threshold so all 10,000' is available. The western runway is still closed.

There was also a Cessna parked on the ramp nearest the eastern runway."



Acording to FAA Airport/Facility Directory data, Calverton Executive Airpark had 2 asphalt & concrete runways: 10,000' Runway 14/32 & 7,000' Runway 5/23.



According to Wikipedia, “As of January 2006, the Navy still owns 358 acres (mostly areas requiring environment cleanup) at the site.

In January 2008, the Riverhead Town Board with newly-elected officers signed a deal to close & sell the airport for $155 million to Riverhead Resorts

which planned a 35-story ski mountain in a $2.2 billion proposed project.

In 2010 Riverhead cancelled the contract after Resorts did not make a $3.9 million payment.

In January 2013, one of the Calverton airport's 2 runways is being used to store thousands of flood-damaged vehicles from Hurricane Sandy.

Development for the central portion of the complex is still undecided as of March 2018.

Various proposals have included building a racing track, a plant to build solar powered planes, building a solar farm, and building a large shopping center.”



The last photo which has been located showing planes at Calverton Executive Airpark was a 2015 aerial view.

A Cessna Caravan, a King Air, and a single-engine Cessna were seen near the Skydive Long Island hangar on the northeast side.



Calverton Executive Airpark's last remaining aviation tennant, Skydive Long Island, closed down in 2015.



Subsequent attemps to redevelop the Calverton facility called the site Enterprise Park at Calverton (EPCAL).



A 2018 aerial view of the Peconic River Airfield showed both runways marked with closed-runway “X” symbols.



A 2018 aerial view of Grumman Memorial Park, on Route 25 along the north side of the Calverton property,

with its display of a Grumman A-6 Intruder & F-14 Tomcat.



Calverton Executive Airpark was still depicted on the 2019 NY Terminal Aeronautical Chart as having a 10,000' northwest/southeast runway, and to conduct skydiving operations,

even though it has evidently been effectively closed for a few years.





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Coram Airport, Coram, NY

40.87, -72.99 (East of New York, NY)

A 1962 aerial photo showed 6 single-engine aircraft parked northwest & southwest of the end of Coram's east/west runway.



No airfield was yet depicted at this location on a 1947 aerial photo.



This small general aviation airport adjacent to the east side of Coram was reportedly established in 1959,

and operated throughout its existence by Tom Murphy, a former military flight instructor & skywriter.

Tall trees at all runway ends reportedly made for interesting approaches.



The earliest depiction which has been located of Coram Airport was a 1962 aerial photo,

which showed 6 single-engine aircraft parked northwest & southwest of the end of Coram's unpaved east/west runway.



Coram Airport was not yet depicted on the 1966 NY Sectional Chart.



A 3/29/66 USGS aerial view of Coram Airport depicted 6 single-engine aircraft parked next to a small building

(described as a dilapidated pilot lounge / workshop) on the north side of an unpaved runway.



The earliest aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Coram Airport

was on the 1967 NYC Local Aeronautical Chart.

It depicted Coram as a private field having a 2,200' unpaved runway.



The earliest topo map depiction which has been located of Coram Airport was on the 1967 USGS topo map.

It depicted Coram Airport as having a single unpaved east/west runway,

with a few small buildings on the northwest side.



A 1972 aerial view looking northwest depicted Coram Airport as having 2 dirt runways,

with a northeast/southwest runway having been added at some point between 1967-72.



The 1972 NYC Terminal Control Area Chart depicted Coram as a public-use airport having a 1,900' unpaved runway.



John Dolan recalled, “Coram: This dirt strip was still open in the 1970s when I started flying.”



Gordon Brown recalled, “Coram Airpark... an instructor who taught there had well over 20,000 hours.”



A 1978 aerial photo showed 6 single-engine aircraft parked on the northwest side of the end of Coram's east/west runway.



Christian Bobka recalled, “I also learned to fly out of the Coram Airport in the late 1970s.”



Ralph Fisch recalled, “I spent many, many hours of riding my bike to watch the Cubs & an old Cessna 172 (straight tail) operate out of Coram Airpark.

I can see it so clearly in my mind's eye, right down to the house with wings hanging in the rafters, and the smell of the oil, dope, stale coffee & cigarettes.”



A circa 1980 aerial view looking west along Coram's east/west runway.



A circa 1980 photo of a Piper Cub landing on Coram's south runway.



The June 1982 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Mitchell Hymowitz)

depicted Coram as a private airfield having a 1,900' unpaved runway.



The last topo map depiction which has been located of Coram Airport was on the 1984 USGS topo map.

It depicted a single east/west runway, labeled simply as “Landing Strip”.



The last photo which has been located showing an aircraft at Coram Airport was a circa 1985 photo of Joshua Stoff checking the oil of a Piper Cub.



Richard Hughes recalled, “Coram Airpark... was a grass strip. It was an ultralight field.”



A 1984 aerial photo showed Coram in the same configuration as seen in the 1978 aerial photo, but devoid of any aircraft.



The last aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Coram Airport

was on the December 1986 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Kevin O'Reilly).

It depicted Coram as a private airfield having a 2,300' unpaved runway.



Bruno Schreck recalled, “I think I was the last guy to land & takeoff from Coram Airport, in a 'real' airplane in about 1989.

I dropped off a client there in my Cessna 172RG Cutlass. It [Coram Airport] still showed on current charts of the time.

And I had called the listed airport operator about 2 weeks before to ask permission & about conditions.

I landed to the northeast at about sundown & taxied to the northwest ramp.

There were several ultralight operators putting away their aircraft when I taxied up. Those ultralight pilots seemed totally shocked.

As it happens, the guy I had talked to came over, but he had either forgotten that I had inquired, or that I had a 'real' plane (or both).

Since it was around sundown, with no runway lights, I don't think I even shut down the engine. I just made my drop-off & taxied back for takeoff.

But my client was impressed that he didn't have to take the Long Island Express, and his wife probably still doesn't believe how he got home from the city via New Jersey.”



Coram Airport was evidently abandoned at some point between 1989-93,

as it was no longer depicted on the December 1993 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Ron Plante).



A 1994 USGS aerial view showed Coram Airpark's 2 runways remained intact though deteriorated.



A 3/6/12 aerial view looking southwest showed that Coram's 2 runways remain intact almost 30 years after the airport was abandoned.



Coram Airport is located southeast of the intersection of Middle Country Road & Mt. Sinai Coram Road.

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Sayville Airport, Sayville, NY

40.752, -73.072 (East of New York, NY)

Sayville Airport, as depicted on the March 1940 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Tim Zukas).



This small general aviation airport was evidently established at some point between 1937-42,

as it was not yet listed among active airfields in The Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airport Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo).



The earliest depiction which has been located of Sayville Airport

was on the March 1940 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Tim Zukas),

which depicted Sayville as an auxiliary airfield.



The earliest photo which has been located of Sayville Airport

was an 8/7/42 aerial view looking north from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted Sayville Airport as an oval-shaped grass landing area with a single hangar at the north end.



The November 1942 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Ron Plante) depicted Sayville as a commercial/municipal airport.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described Sayville Airport

as a 22 acre rectangular property having a 1,500' north/south all-way sod field.

Sayville was described as having 2 metal & wood hangars, measuring 50' x 50' & 40' x 25'.

The field was said to be owned by private interests,

but “Not in operation” (most likely due to wartime security restrictions on small civilian airports near the coasts).



According to Webb Morrison, “The Sayville Airport was established [maybe reestablished?] by Allen Thomas & Philomena Farrell in 1945

and they opened the Long Island School of Aeronautics which, for veterans, qualified under the GI Bill of Rights.

The airport also offered the standard services of hangar storage, tie downs, and repairs.”



The last aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Sayville Airport was on the July 1946 NY Sectional Chart,

which depicted Sayville as an auxiliary airfield.



The last photo which has been located of the original Sayville Airport was a 1947 aerial view.

It depicted Sayville Airport as an oval-shaped grass landing area with a single hangar at the north end.

No planes were visible on the field.



Charles Schnepp recalled, “Sayville Airport... I got my pilots license there in 1948.

It was a grass field with dirt runways & was located just a few miles south of McArthur Airport.

It was owned & operated by Al Thomas & Sis Farrell.

He was the instructor, she was the manager. They had no other employees.

65 years & 5,000 hours later, I will never forget them.”



The last depiction which has been located of the original Sayville Airport was on the 1949 USGS topo map,

which also depicted the replacement New Sayville Airport to the north.



The original Sayville Airport evidently closed (for reasons unknown) at some point between 1949-50,

as it was no longer depicted on the 1950 NY Sectional Chart,

which instead depicted a “New Sayville” Airport a half-mile further south.



A 1954 aerial photo did not show any recognizable sign of the original Sayville Airport.



A 3/6/12 aerial photo did not show any remaining trace of the original Sayville Airport.



The site of Sayville Airport is located northwest of the intersection of Broadway Avenue & Montauk Highway.

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New Sayville Airport, Sayville, NY

40.762, -73.072 (East of New York, NY)

A 1947 aerial view of New Sayville Airport.



According to the Sayville Library, “Application was made to establish an airfield in a Residential 'A' district in December 1941.”



According to the Sayville Library, “After approval, in 1945 the land was bought by Allan Thomas who, in partnership with Philomena 'Sis' Farrell, opened the Airport.

Allen - an ex-Air Force Captain, licensed as a flight instructor in multi-engine & airline transport training courses

as well as a licensed airline captain in his own right - established the Long Island School of Aeronautics, a flying school.

The first student was George Maklos, a bus driver from Patchogue.

By October, 63 students were receiving instruction in Piper Cubs or a Stinson V-77,

many under the GI Bill of Rights, and the airport had 6 T-shaped hangars.

Among students were local physician Peter Lerner & local lawyer George McInerney; McInerney entertained at one airshow with aerobatics in a biplane.

A second popular show act was 'The Flying Farmer' in which Thomas demonstrated what NOT to do in the air.

A third advertised attraction were passenger flights including 'Night Flights Over Sayville' at $2.50 each.

Beyond various levels of flight instruction, the airport also offered standard services of hangar storage, tie-downs and repairs.

Allan Thomas was also a frequent volunteer participant in air searches for missing persons (and bodies).”



This small general aviation airport replaced the original Sayville Airport located just a half-mile to the south.



New Sayville Airport was not yet depicted on the July 1946 NY Sectional Chart.



The earliest depiction which has been located of New Sayville Airport was a 1947 aerial photo.

It depicted New Sayville as having 2 grass runways in an X-shape.

One single-engine aircraft & 6 individual T-hangars were visible on the southeast side.



The earliest aeronautical depiction which has been located of New Sayville Airport was on the July 1949 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Ron Plante).

It depicted New Sayville as having a 3,000' unpaved runway.



The 1949 USGS topo map depicted both the New Sayville Airport & the predecessor Sayville Airport to the south.



The last aeronautical depiction which has been located of New Sayville Airport was on the 1950 NY Sectional Chart.

It depicted New Sayville as having a 3,000' unpaved runway.



A 4/7/54 aerial photo depicted New Sayville as having 2 grass runways in an X-shape.

A hangar, 7 individual T-hangars, and 4 single-engine aircraft were visible on the east side.



A Cessna T-50 Bamboo Bomber & another aircraft in the aftermath at New Sayville Airport from Hurricane Carol in September 1954.



Another view of the Cessna T-50 Bamboo Bomber in between some small buildings at New Sayville Airport after Hurricane Carol in September 1954.



According to Webb Morrison, “Unfortunately, Hurricane Carol in September 1954 destroyed both planes & hangars.

This - and also perhaps because of expanding services at nearby MacArthur [Airport] -

resulted in Thomas selling the 122 acres to developers in June 1955.

The Town returning the zoning to its original residential 'A' & the rest is history.”



New Sayville Airport was no longer depicted at all on the 1957 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Mike Keefe).



A 1961 aerial photo showed the abandoned New Sayville Airport,

with the 2 runways still remaining intact though deteriorated.

It appeared as if only the foundations remained of the hangar & T-hangars.



David Van Weele reported, “The landing field was removed probably in the early 1960s.

I worked on designing the housing development that is there now.

This is just south of Sayville Ford.”



A 1966 aerial photo showed houses covering the southern half of the airport site.

The northwest end of the runway remained recognizable, along with the foundation of the main hangar.



A 1969 aerial photo showed houses covering the remainder of the property,

erasing the last traces of New Sayville Airport.



A 3/6/12 aerial photo did not show any remaining trace of the New Sayville Airport.



The site of Sayville Airport is located southwest of the intersection of Broadway Avenue & Sunrise Highway.

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