Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields

New York City: Brooklyn & Manhattan

© 2002, © 2014 by Paul Freeman. Revised 6/11/14.

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Barren Island Airport / Floyd Bennett Field / New York NAS / Brooklyn CGAS (revised 12/10/13) - Governor's Island AAF (revised 6/11/14)

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Governor's Island Army Airfield, Governor's Island, NY

40.69 North / 74.02 West (South of Manhattan, NY)

A 1924 aerial view of the southwest end of Governor's Island (from the NYCityMap, courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



How many residents of New York City know about this former military airfield

which was located on an island in the middle of New York Harbor, right next to the Statue of Liberty?

 

Governor's Island's connection to aviation goes all the way back to September 29, 1909,

when Wilbur Wright made the 1st flight from the Island around the Statue of Liberty.



Another historic flight occurred on May 29, 1910,

when Glenn Curtis landed on the Island to complete his flight from Albany

and win a $10,000 prize offered by Joseph Pulitzer, publisher of the New York World.



A memorial in honor of the early Governor's Island flights was erected on the south side of Liggett Hall on December 17, 1954

by the "Early Birds", an organization of "those who flew solo before December 17, 1916."



During the next few years other flights from the Island were made by aviation pioneers,

and from May 1916 to March 1917, an aviation training center was operated there.

With the approval of Major General Leonard Wood, Commander of Governors Island,

a group of civilians established the flying school to promote the development of military aviation.



The earliest depiction which has been located of Governor's Island

was 1924 aerial view (from the NYCityMap, courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It showed a cleared grass northeast/southwest runway,

with a row of buildings (hangars?) along the southeast side.



The Governor's Island Airfield, as depicted (the red rectangle) on a circa 1924 Sperry Instruments map of landing fields (courtesy of Tom Heitzman).



The Governor's Island Airfield was evidently closed at some point between 1924-29,

as it was no longer depicted on the 1929 Washington – New York City Air Navigation Map #3.



The next phase in the timeline of Governor's Island's connection to aviation came in the 1950s,

when the U.S. Army established a grass landing strip on the island.

The date of establishment of the Governor's Island Army Airfield has not been precisely determined.

It evidently was constructed at some point between 1950-54,

as it was not yet depicted on the 1947 USGS topo map nor on the 1950 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Mike Keefe).



A 1951 aerial showed Governor's Island to have a single unpaved grass runway, bracketed by several baseball diamonds.



The only photo which has been located showing aircraft on Governor's Island was a 1954 aerial view,

which depicted a total of 5 single-engine aircraft parked along the northwest side of the grass runway.



The 1955 USGS topo map did not depict any runway or other aviation facilities on Governor's Island.



An undated (circa 1955?) aerial view looking north at Governor's Island (courtesy of Ed Drury),

with the Manhattan skyline visible in the background.

The runway was still recognizable in the center of the island, but still bracketed by several baseball diamonds.



The earliest chart depiction of the Governor's Island airfield which has been located

was on the 1957 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of Mike Keefe).

It depicted Governor's Island AAF as having a 2,200' unpaved runway.

 

The 1960 Jeppesen Airway Manual (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

depicted Governor's Island AAF as having a single 2,140' unpaved Runway 4/22.

 

The 1962 NY Local Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Mike Keefe)

depicted Governor's Island AAF as having a 2,100' unpaved runway.

 

According to CAP Lt. Col. Henry Deutch, “Prior to the closing of the airfield on Governor's Island

all 1st Army aviation was headquartered at Fort Jay.

When Capehart Family Housing replaced the Governor's Island Airfield,

1st Army Fixed Wing Operations were transferred to Miller Army Airfield.”



The Governor's Island AAF was evidently closed (for reasons unknown) at some point between 1962-65,

as it was no longer depicted on the 1965 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).

 

By 1966, Governor's Island itself had been ceded by the Army to the Coast Guard,

who apparently did not find any need for an airfield on their new island.

A 1966 aerial view showed the runway remained clear, but there were no aircraft visible on the field.



The 1967 USGS topo map did not depict any runway or other aviation facilities on Governor's Island.



A 1980 aerial view showed that baseball fields had covered the former runway at some point between 1966-80.



The Coast Guard vacated Governor's Island in 1996.

The island was been planned to be reopened as a park,

but those plans have been continually delayed,

and the island was still not open to the public as of 2004.



A circa 2001-2005 USGS aerial photo showed the area formerly occupied by the grass runway on Governor's Island to still remain open.



A 2009 photo by Ronald Claiborne of the monument commemorating Governor's Island's early aviation history.

The text on the monument reads: “Early aviation history was made here when these pioneers flew powered aircraft to and from this site between 1909-16.

Wilbur Wright, Lincoln Beachy, Glenn Curtiss, Eugene Ely, Charles Hamilton, Hugh Robinson, Harry Atwood, James Ward, Harry Jones. Albert Heinrich,

Harold Kanther, Victor Carlstrom, Steve MacGordon, Raynal Bolling, Ruth Law.

From May 1916 to March 1917, members of the Governors Island Training Corps flight trained here.

Captain Philip Carroll – Commanding, Filip Bjorklund – Instructor, Charles Reed, Lawrence Sperry, Walter Struthers,

Hobart Baker, William Aarned, Al Sturtevant, Frederick Blakeman. Edwin Post, Stedman Hanks, William Walton,

Cord Meyer, Albert Gaines, Charles Wiman, Howard Lapsley, James Miller, John Rutherford, Seth Low.

Major General Leonard Wood, U.S.A. - Commanding, Headquarters, Eastern Department.

Erected under the auspices of the Early Birds, an organization of those who flew solo before December 17, 1916.”



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Barren Island Airport / Floyd Bennett Field / New York Naval Air Station /

Brooklyn Coast Guard Air Station (NOP), Brooklyn, NY

40.6 North / 73.9 West (Southwest of Kennedy Airport)

The only photo which has been located of Barren Island Airport was a circa 1927-28 photo of an Epps Model 1924 monoplane at Barren Island.



The first airport on this site was a small field named Barren Island Airport.

Pilot Paul Rizzo established established Barren Island Airport in 1927.

He used a compacted dirt runway to take up customers for joy-rides.



The airfield layout from the 3/29/28 dedication program for the “Municipal Airport for the City of New York” (courtesy of Tom Heitzman).



According to Peter Maefield's 1972 Wings Club of NYC speech (courtesy of Dave Kanzeg),

In 1928, in the course of the post-Lindbergh boom in aviation,

Clarence Chamberlain was commissioned by the City of New York to recommend a site for a new, close-in, airport.

He chose Barren Island - a dumping ground in Brooklyn.

New York City pumped sand out of Jamaica Bay, and made a 321-acre airport, raised some 16 feet above sea level.

It was connected to Flatbush Avenue which runs across Kings, Brooklyn to the Manhattan Bridge.

Clearly it was an excellent site, 13 miles from 42nd Street.

It was also given the title of 'Floyd Bennett Municipal Airport' after Admiral Richard Byrd's pilot & right-hand man on earlier Polar flights.”



As initially constructed, Floyd Bennett Field had 2 concrete runways: 4,000' Runway 6/24 & 3,100' Runway 15/33.



The “Municipal Airport for the City of New York” was dedicated on 3/29/28,

according to a Flatbush Chamber of Commerce dedication program (courtesy of Tom Heitzman).



Upon completion of the field, Floyd Bennett was selected by the Navy as the site of one of 8 Naval Reserve Bases,

with the mission of providing flight training.



The earliest aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Floyd Bennett Field was on the 1929 Washington - New York City Air Navigation Map #3.

It depicted Floyd Bennett as having a landplane airfield & a seaplane base.



A 1929 City of NY Desk Atlas of Brooklyn depicted an outline around “Municipal Airport (Floyd Bennett Field)”.



The NYPD Aviation Bureau was established at Floyd Bennett Field in 1929

when the Police Air Service Division was established from funds donated by Rodman Wanamaker, a famed World War I ace.

One of the first planes purchased was a 3-seat Loening Commuter Amphibian, powered by 90 horsepower engine.

The 3rd seat, called the "Angel" seat, was kept vacant for the angel the crew hoped would ride with them on each flight.

One of the first rescues was made when 2 swimmers were carried away by the tide.

The water was too choppy for landing, so the copilot leaped from the flying plane into the water & both swimmers were towed to shore.



A postmark commemorated the 6/26/30 Dedication by Rear Adminral Richard Byrd of Floyd Bennett Municipal Airport.



According to Peter Maefield's 1972 Wings Club of NYC speech (courtesy of Dave Kanzeg),

It was dedicated as 'The Municipal Airport for the City of New York' on 5/23/31.”



Navy operations began at the field in 1931, which was designated Brooklyn Naval Air Station.

The Army mail service also shared the field in the early years.



A 1931 aerial view looking southeast showed Floyd Bennett Field to have 2 runways & 4 hangars along the west side.



A circa 1930s photo of a NYPD Loening Commuter flying boat at Floyd Bennett.



According to Peter Maefield's 1972 Wings Club of NYC speech (courtesy of Dave Kanzeg),

During the next decade [the 1930s] the field was the origin & the destination of a large number of pioneering flights -

its runways were the pathways to fame, or to disaster.

Trans-Atlantic, trans-Continental & round-the-world flights followed in quick succession;

the names in the Floyd Bennett Field's hall of fame include Boardman & Polando, Codos & Rossi, Amelia Earhart,

Mattern & Griffin, Merrill & Lambie, Howard Hughes, Pangborn & Herndon, Post & Gatty, and Roscoe Turner.

Here the Marquis Francesco de Pinedo met his death on 9/2/33 in a take-off crash.

And here, in the waters off Floyd Bennett, in Jamaica Bay, Marshal Italo Balbo brought his armada

of 24 Savoia Marchetti S.55X twin-hull flying-boats in July 1933, in the first mass crossing of the Atlantic.”



A Seversky floatplane over the Floyd Bennett runway in 1933.

 

An aerial view looking southeast at Floyd Bennet Field, looking northeast,

from The Airport Directory Company's 1933 Airports Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

The directory described Floyd Bennet Field as having 2 concrete runways:

4,200' northeast/southwest & 3,110' northwest/southeast.

The aerial photo in the directory depicted eight hangars, flanking the administration building.

These hangars were described as "fireproof",

and they were said to "offer the finest facilities & the most modern improvements in hangar design."

A seaplane ramp was said to already be in use,

with "a large seaplane base" planned,

"construction work on 2 seaplane hangars" to be started in the near future.

The operators were listed as Erickson & Remmert,

Nicholas-Beazley Airplane Company, Inc., United Air Services,

and the U.S. Naval Reserve Base.



A 5/13/34 aerial view looking northwest at the hangars, terminal, ramps, and runways of Floyd Bennett Field.



The Army mail service moved from Floyd Bennett to Mitchel Field in 1934.



Floyd Bennett Field, as depicted on the 1934 U.S. Navy Aviation Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



According to Peter Maefield's 1972 Wings Club of NYC speech (courtesy of Dave Kanzeg),

In May 1934 American Airlines made Floyd Bennett its commercial New York terminal in place of Newark.”



Roscoe Turner's Weddell-Williams racer, as he arrived on 9/1/34 at Floyd Bennett Field

after flying from Burbank, CA to New York in 10 hours 2 minutes, establishing a new speed record.

The Floyd Bennett administration building & control tower are in the background.



Floyd Bennett Field, as depicted on the 1935 Regional Aeronautical Chart.



In 1936, the 3,500' Runway 1/19 & the 3,200' Runway 13/30 were added,

and Runway 15/33 was slightly lengthened to 3,500'.



According to Peter Maefield's 1972 Wings Club of NYC speech (courtesy of Dave Kanzeg),

The end of an era came in sight when, in January 1936, Mayor La Guardia leased Floyd Bennett Field to the U.S. Coast Guard for 50 years.”



A postmark commemorated the 3/20/37 Formal Opening of the U.S. Coast Guard Base Brooklyn.



A 1937 poster promoting Floyd Bennett Field.

 

An aerial view of Floyd Bennet Field, looking northeast,

from The Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airports Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo).

The directory described Floyd Bennet Field as a municipal airport.

It was described as having four concrete runways,

with the longest being a 4,200' northeast/southwest runway.

The aerial photo in the directory depicted eight hangars, flanking the administration building.

These hangars were described as "fireproof",

and they were said to "offer the finest facilities & the most modern improvements in hangar design."



Julian Goldman recalled, “When I was a kid, I worked for my 1st airplane ride in 1937

with Jack Loesing, chief pilot for Erickson & Remmerrt.

Loesing had a devil painted on the rudder & was called the red devil.

Dick Swanson had a Waco C & had Popeye painted on the rudder.

Eddy Lions had an old Curtiss Robin with a lion on the rudder.

Those were lean days & they all struggled to make a living.”



A 1930s aerial view looking north at the Floyd Bennett hangars.

Photo courtesy of The Cradle of Aviation Museum, Garden City, Long Island via Leo Polaski

"These photographs do not belong to me, they belong to the respective Museums.

ALL permission to use these photographs in publications MUST be obtained from the Museums,

I ONLY have permission to post here as long as no profit is obtained by me."



A circa 1938 photo (courtesy of Norman Kellman) of a Fleet biplane

in front of a hangar at Floyd Bennett entitled "Erickson and Remmert Inc.".

According to Jack Gordon, he purchased Fleet NC437K for “all of $100.00 & flew it for a considerable time before rebuilding.

I was given my private license flight test by a man named Milt Gerten there at Floyd Bennett in about 1938 or 1939.”



Floyd Bennett Field's most storied flight was probably that of Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan

who in 1938, after repeatedly being denied permission by the authorities to attempt a non-stop flight to Ireland,

"accidentally" crossed the Atlantic in a second-hand surplus aircraft on a flight registered to go to California.

In the midst of the Great Depression a hero-starved nation hailed Corrigan for his "accident",

even unto giving him a ticker-tape parade in Manhattan upon his return (the authorities had him sail back on a ship).



An August 10-13, 1938 photo of an unidentified man with the Focke-Wolfe Fw 200 S-1"Brandenburg" Condor in front of a Floyd Bennett hangar.

Photo courtesy of The Cradle of Aviation Museum, Garden City, Long Island via Leo Polaski

"These photographs do not belong to me, they belong to the respective Museums.

ALL permission to use these photographs in publications MUST be obtained from the Museums,

I ONLY have permission to post here as long as no profit is obtained by me."



An undated (presumably 1938) photo of Howard Hughes & his Lockheed Super Electra in front of Floyd Bennett's Erickson & Remmert hangar.



Famous aviator Howard Hughes departed Floyd Bennett Field on 7/9/38

in a Lockheed 14 Super Electra, named New York World's Fair 1939, on a 'Round the World' flight to promote the upcoming fair.

Hughes returned to Floyd Bennett on July 14, after completing the 14,672 mile flight in 3 days, 19 hours, 14 minutes, and 10 seconds, setting a new world's record.



A 1938 photo of an assemblage of Army Air Corps Boeing P-26 Peashooter fighters at Floyd Bennett (courtesy of John Voss).



Three 1939 pictures taken at Floyd Bennett Field (courtesy of Julian Goldman).

The top photo is of Julian Goldman in front of a Waco N biplane, NC19399, owned by Erickson & Remmert.

The center picture of the Waco N coming back after a sightseeing ride.

The bottom picture is a Stinson Gullwing was flown by a guy named Kenny Neville, who also took people for rides.”



A 6/6/39 USCG aerial view by J.E. Horwath looking east at the Coast Guard Air Station on the east side of Floyd Bennett Field,

showing a hangar and a seaplane ramp leading down into the bay, with a single aircraft visible on another ramp at the right edge of the photo.



By 1939, the newer & larger LaGuardia Airport had become New York City's primary municipal airport.

Therefore, by 1941 Floyd Bennett was completely taken over by the Navy, which renamed it New York NAS.



A 6/2/41 postmark commemorated the Dedication of the “Greater Naval Air Station Floyd Bennett Field”.



A 1941 photo of large numbers of Navy aircraft at Floyd Bennett Field.



A new 5,000' Runway 6/24 was constructed in 1942, running perpendicular to Flatbush Avenue on the North side of the field.

The original Runway 6/24 became taxiways T-1 & T-2 at this point, and the original Runway 15/33 also became taxiway T-10.

Runways 1/19 & 12/30 were both lengthened to 5,000'.



A circa 1942 aerial view looking west at Floyd Bennett Field.



A circa 1940s photo (courtesy of Everett Priestley) of CGAS Brooklyn & its helicopter training group, with Sikorsky R-4 helicopters.

 

A circa 1940s photo (courtesy of Everett Priestley) of 6 Sikorsky R-4 helicopters hovering in front of the CGAS Brooklyn hangar.



A 1944 photo (courtesy of Everett Priestley) of the very 1st helicopter synthetic training device (flight simulator),

as used inside a hangar at CGAS Brooklyn.

Capt Frank Erickson directed the helicopter training squadron for the Navy,

and trained students from all the US armed forces plus Canadians & British military students.



A circa 1940s view of a Coast Guard Grumman J2F Duck amphibian

(which has been manufactured only a few miles away in either Bethpage or Valley Stream NY)

in front of a Floyd Bennett hangar.



A WW2-era aerial view looking southeast at New York NAS (National Archives photo).



During WW2, the base reached a peak complement of 6,500,

and operated both land planes & seaplanes from an adjacent ramp.

A primary mission of the base was the testing & delivery

of newly completed aircraft from Long Island's many nearby aircraft factories.



During WW2, Floyd Bennett had one satellite field, Rockaway NAS.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described “New York NAS (Floyd Bennett Field)”

as a 1,288 acre irregularly-shaped property within which were four 5,000' asphaltic concrete runways & a blimp mooring mast.

The field was said to have a total of 9 hangars, with the largest being a 262' x 132' wood structure.

The NAS had one auxiliary field: Rockaway Beach Outlying Field.



A circa 1940s view of the prototype of the incredible Chance-Vought V-173 Flying Flapjack.



An undated patch for NAS New York.



An undated colorized photo by Rudy Arnold of a Cub in front of the Floyd Bennett Field terminal.



A late 1940s photo of Royal Navy Sea Hornets & American military aircraft at Floyd Bennett Field.



A 1947 photo of a Lockheed R6O Constitution at Floyd Bennett Field.

The Constitution remains the largest fixed-wing aircraft type ever operated by the U.S. Navy.

Photo courtesy of The Cradle of Aviation Museum, Garden City, Long Island via Leo Polaski

"These photographs do not belong to me, they belong to the respective Museums.

ALL permission to use these photographs in publications MUST be obtained from the Museums,

I ONLY have permission to post here as long as no profit is obtained by me."



A Boeing PB-1G (Coast Guard version of the B-17) at Floyd Bennett in 1948.



Commercial flying at the field resumed after WW2,

and it was once again called Floyd Bennett Municipal Airport.

The Navy continued some operations at the field,

with a Naval Air Reserve Training Center being the primary remaining Navy use.



A 1954 aerial view of the Coast Guard ramp on the east side of Floyd Bennett,

showing what appear to be 2 Grumman HU-16 amphibians, a single PB-1 (Coast Guard B-17), and several smaller unidentified aircraft.



A circa 1955 USCG photo looking southeast at a Sikorsky HO35-1G & a Grumman HU-16 Albatross on the Coast Guard Air Station Brooklyn ramp.



An undated (circa 1950s?) photo of a North American FJ-3 Fury fighter of VF-73 at Floyd Bennett Field.



The 1964 NY Local Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of John De Nicola) depicted NAS New York as having 4 paved runways.



A circa 1965 photo (courtesy of Norman Kellman)

of NAS New York's main gate, off of Flatbush Avenue.

 

NAS New York was described on the 1965 NY Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss)

as having a total of four bituminous & concrete runways, with the longest being 7,000'.

However, the remarks included, "Runway 15/33 closed."



The last photo which has been located showing military aircraft based at Floyd Bennett was a 1966 aerial view,

showing large numbers of A-4 Skyhawks, P-2 Neptunes, and several smaller unidentified aircraft on the Naval Air Reserve ramp on the east side of the field.



According to Peter Maefield's 1972 Wings Club of NYC speech (courtesy of Dave Kanzeg),

Yet another stage in the history of the old Barren Island site came in March 1971

when the title 'Naval Air Station' was dropped & Floyd Bennett became a Naval Air Reserve Training Detachment -

a technical training center for ground crews.

In that year also the Port of New York Authority discontinued negotiations with the U.S. Navy on the purchase of the field

for which the Navy sought $1,200,000 against the Port Authority's offer of $750,000 plus $300,000 annually.

Floyd Bennet remains what, clearly, could be a most valuable reserve of runway capacity to meet New York's growing commercial needs.”



The majority of the airfield property became the Gateway National Recreation Area in 1974.

The remaining property (constituting the area occupied by Coast Guard Air Station Brooklyn)

officially transferred to the Coast Guard & was no longer leased.



After the closure of the runways to fixed-wing aircraft,

Floyd Bennett was used for a few years as a base for helicopter units of the Coast Guard & New York City Police.



The 1979 USGS topo map labeled the site as “Nav Res”.



"CGAS Brooklyn" was labeled "Heliport Only" on the 1979 NY TCA Chart (courtesy of Bill Suffa),

although the runways were still depicted as well.



A 1980 aerial view depicted a mere 2 Coast Guard helicopters as the only aircraft on the extensive airfield,

quite a contrast from the 1966 photos showing an airfield packed with military aircraft.



The 1988 USGS topo map labeled the site as “Brooklyn Heliport”.



As seen in the 1992 USGS aerial photo of Floyd Bennett Field,

three paved runways (the longest is approximately 7,500' long), extensive ramps & numerous hangars still existed.



The 1992 USGS topo map still labeled the site as “U.S. Naval Air Station Floyd Bennett Field”,

even though it had ceased to be a Navy installation 21 years earlier.



A 1994 photo by Alan Malachowsky from final approach to Runway 30, of which a 1,000' portion was re-painted

for a small fly-in of aircraft commemorating the field's 50th anniversary.



Since July 1997 the Marine Corps Reserve's 6th Communication Battalion

has been based on the southeast portion of Floyd Bennett Field.



In the 1990s, budget considerations prompted the Coast Guard to consolidate the helicopter operations

of Brooklyn & Cape May NJ at a new location at Atlantic City International Airport.

The new facility at Atlantic City opened in 1998,

at which point the Coast Guard Air Station Brooklyn was decommissioned.



The majority of the former Coast Guard property then transferred to the National Park Service.

A small portion remained in the possession of the USCG parent agency at the time (the Department of Transportation),

and a Doppler radar tower was placed there for use by nearby Kennedy International Airport.



The NYPD moved their aviation operation from a historic hangar

to the former Coast Guard air station facilities shortly afterward.

That left the NYPD as the only remaining aviation unit on the field,

and the airfield was renamed "NYPD Air Operations Heliport".



A 1998 Park Service map of Floyd Bennett Field.



A 1999 photo of a Beech AT-18 & Grumman Goose, part of the collection of the Northeast Aircraft Restoration Facility,

in front of the original terminal & control tower.



One of the historic hangars, now used by the NYPD Air Operations Unit.



The terminal & control tower are now being restored

by the Park Service as the Ryan Visitor Center. 

 

There is also a small aviation museum on the field,

the Northeast Aircraft Restoration Facility,

which has been occasionally allowed to fly in aircraft being added to their collection,

even after the closure of the runways at Floyd Bennett.



A 2002 photo by Tom Turner of a Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter,

being restored by the Berlin Airlift Historical Foundation inside a hangar at Floyd Bennett.

 

A 2003 photo by Tom Turner of an Airship Industries Skyship 600 which operated from the east ramp at Floyd Bennett.



Aviator Sports & Recreation Complex & the National Park Service began their relationship in 2003

to adaptively reuse 4 of Floyd Bennett Field's original hangars (combining them into one 170,000 square foot building)

and surrounding land, creating a sports complex totaling 25 acres.

As a historic site, the NPS has set forth strict guidelines

in order to uphold the integrity of the airport hangars that are in use by Aviator Sports & Recreation.

Any modifications made to the hangars are to adhere to the requirements set forth

to preserve the original aesthetic structure of the hangars.

Aviator Sports and Recreation and the NPS have made a commitment to promote the airport's history

to insure that the contributions of Floyd Bennett Field are memorialized

for the education of all visitors to Aviator Sports & Recreation.



A 2005 aerial photo by Paul Freeman, taken from a Diamond Eclipse at 8,000 feet, looking southeast at Floyd Bennett.



A circa 2005 aerial photo looking north at the former Floyd Bennett terminal building.



A circa 2005 aerial photo looking north at a police Bell 206 JetRanger in front of a hangar on the east side of Floyd Bennett Field.



A diagram of the Aviator Sports & Recreation Complex, which opened in November 2006.

The complex was built by reusing portions of 4 original hangars on the west side of Floyd Bennett Field (along with modern construction in between),

creating 170,000 square feet of indoor recreation space.



A 2006 photo of Concorde G-BOAD being towed in front of the Aviator Sports & Recreation complex on the Floyd Bennett ramp.

The historic SST had been displayed alongside Manhattan's Pier 86 at the USS Intrepid museum complex,

but the operators of Aviator Sports & Recreation agreed to temporarily relocate the plane to Floyd Bennett Field for 18 months

during the renovation of the Pier 86 complex.

The Concorde’s owner, British Airways, wanted the plane to stay on view in the city,

to continue serving as a billboard for the airline, a spokesman said.

The Concorde was towed on its barge to a ramp that extends into Jamaica Bay on the east side of Floyd Bennett Field.

A crane then lifted it onto a runway where with its oleos re-inflated,

it was towed across a runway to be parked in front of the the hangars that had been converted to house Aviator’s ice-skating rinks & basketball courts.

Aviator’s management hoped that the Concorde would draw attention to the center.



A 2007 photo by Mark Williams looking south at the west ramp of Floyd Bennett,

with the former terminal building & a Concorde SST at the bottom.



A 2007 photo by Mark Williams looking east at Floyd Bennett Field.



As of 2007, the New York City Police Department has some divisions located on the historic former airfield.

The department's aviation base, with its fleet of Bell Jet Ranger helicopters,

is housed in space leased from the National Park Service that was once the United States Coast Guard Air Station Brooklyn,

and is also now the headquarters for the NYPD Emergency Services Unit.

The Driver Training Unit is also located there,

using a section of former runway to teach new & veteran officers on the operation of the many different vehicles used by the department.



As seen in a 2007 aerial photo of Floyd Bennett Field,

three paved runways (the longest is approximately 7,500' long),

extensive ramps & numerous hangars still exist.



A September 8, 2007 aerial view by Stephen Moran on approach to Floyd Bennett's Runway 24 for a Fly In.



A September 8, 2007 aerial view by Stephen Moran looking north at Floyd Bennett Field during a Fly In.



A September 8, 2007 photo by Stephen Moran of a ski-equipped Lockheed LC-130 Hercules coming into Floyd Bennett for a Fly In.



A September 8, 2007 photo by Stephen Moran of a Grumman Avenger in front of the Floyd Bennett control tower

along with numerous other aircraft during a Fly In.



Don Brzezinski reported in 2008, “If you go in the basement of the Administration Building you will find tunnels

that look like the subway [tiled walls] these lead out to the ramp.

There were stairs up to the surface where parked aircraft could be boarded with out crossing the ramp; quite novel for the times.”



A 12/17/09 photo by Butch Moran of the Douglas C-54 “Spirit of Freedom” taxiing in from a landing,

with the historic Floyd Bennett terminal buildng in the background.



A 12/17/09 photo by Butch Moran of the Douglas C-54 “Spirit of Freedom” inside Floyd Bennett's Hangar B, with a C-97 & P-2 also visible.



A 3/16/10 photo by Butch Moran of the Douglas C-54 “Spirit of Freedom” taking off from Floyd Bennett.

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