Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields:

Northwestern Ohio

© 2002, © 2014 by Paul Freeman. Revised 1/1/14.

This site covers airfields in all 50 states: Click here for the site's main menu.

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Bellefontaine Municipal (revised 11/29/13) - Camp Perry National Guard (revised 11/29/13) - Franklin Airport (revised 7/28/13)

Lima Airport / Allen County Airport (revised 11/29/13) - National Airport (revised 9/7/12)

Stickney Avenue Airport (added 9/12/12) - Waco Aircraft Company / Troy-Waco Airport (revised 7/7/12) - Wapakoneta Airport (revised 1/1/14)

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Wapakoneta Airport / Port Koneta, Wapakoneta, OH

40.6 North / 84.18 West (South of Toledo, OH)

A postmark commemorating the 9/8/46 Airport Dedication & Airshow at Port Koneta.

Photo of the airport while in use has not been located.



According to “Memories of Port Koneta” by Richard Schwer (courtesy of Jim Hackman),

It all started during the spring & summer of 1946.

A group of local people built an airport north of Wapakoneta on what was know as 'the Brewery Road' now known as the Wapakoneta-Cridersville Road.

The original hangar, a long wooden building that extends to the east from near the road, was the only building that was there in 1946.”



The most famous product of Wapakoneta Airport was the man who would later be first to walk on the moon, astronaut Neil Armstrong.

According to Wikipedia, “[Neil] Armstrong took flying lessons at the grassy Wapakoneta airfield.

He earned a student flight certificate on his 16th birthday [8/5/46], then soloed later in August; all before he had a driver's license.”



According to “Memories of Port Koneta” by Richard Schwer (courtesy of Jim Hackman),

It was estimated by the Wapakoneta Daily News that 10,000 persons visited Port Koneta airfield on 9/8/46 for the dedication of the new airport.

Spectators were entertained by the U.S. Army Air Force show with a thrilling aerobatic performance.

On exhibit were many planes & a helicopter which made it a most successful & gratifying event.”



According to “Memories of Port Koneta” by Richard Schwer (courtesy of Jim Hackman),

The original air field only lasted about 18 months & was closed due to the lack of support by the people.

The original thought behind the opening of the airport was that many of the returning WW2 pilots would want & need a place to continue flying,

which turned out to be far from the truth.”



According to “Memories of Port Koneta” by Richard Schwer (courtesy of Jim Hackman),

The building on the south side of the hangar was added in the 1950s

when the airport was reopened for a few short years by Burdette Metzger, a Wapakoneta man.”



The earliest depiction which has been located of Wapakoneta Airport was on the 1962 USGS topo map.

It depicted Wapakoneta as having 2 unpaved runways, with 3 small buildings on the west side.



Jim Hackman recalled, “Wapakoneta Airport... I got my Certified Flight Instructor [rating] there & instructed in 1962.”



An undated license plate frame, promoting “I fly at Port Koneta”.



Wapakoneta Airport was apparently closed at some point between 1962-69,

as only the new Neil Armstrong Airport (to the southwest) was depicted on the 1969 Chicago Sectional Chart.





The earliest photo which has been located of the site of Wapakoneta Airport was a 4/16/71 USGS aerial view.

The 3 airport buildings still stood along the west side, and the remnants of the 2 grass runways were still recognizable.



The 1973 USGS topo map still depicted the 3 buildings (hangars?) from Wapakoneta Airport,

but the runways were no longer depicted.



The former runways were no longer discernible on a 1994 USGS aerial photo.



A 4/6/12 aerial photo shows the 3 airport buildings still stood along the west side of the site of Wapakoneta Airport,

with the runway site having been returned to cultivation.

Does the farmer of the property realize this is the hallowed ground where the first man to walk on the moon learned to fly?



The site of Wapakoneta Airport is located southeast of the intersection of Wapakoneta Cridersville Road & Wapakoneta Buckland Road.



Thanks to Jim Hackman for pointing out this airfield.

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Stickney Avenue Airport, Toledo, OH

41.7 North / 83.52 West (Northwest of Columbus, OH)

Stickey Avenue Airport, as depicted on the 1938 USGS topo map (courtesy of Don Reed).

Photo of the airport has not been located.



According to the Toledo City Paper, Stickney Avenue Airport opened in October 1927.

They wrote, “1928: Due to poor planning, Stickney is replaced 8 months later by the more effectively located Toledo Transcontinental Airport.”



However, Stickney Airport continued to operate for years, as it continued to be depicted on aeronautical charts & maps.



The earliest depiction which has been located of Stickney Avenue Airport was on the 1938 USGS topo map (courtesy of Don Reed).

It depicted an open landing area, with 2 small buildings on the northwest side, labeled simply as “Airport”.



The earliest aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Stickney Avenue Airport was on the March 1940 Cleveland Sectional Chart.

It depicted Stickney Avenue as a commercial/municipal field.



Stickney Avenue Airport was evidently closed at some point between 1940-42,

as it was no longer depicted on the February 1942 Cleveland Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



The Stickney Plant, a large factory, was opened in 1942 by auto parts manufacturer Autolite on the site of the Stickney Avenue Airport.



The 1954 USGS topo map showed 2 airport buildings remained depicted on the northwest side of the airport property,

but a large factory had covered the southern portion of the airfield.



The 1968 USGS topo map showed a 2nd large building had been added on the south side of the property between 1954-68.



Amazingly, the 2 airport buildings were still depicted on the northwest side of the airport site on the 1980 USGS topo map.



In 1981, the Stickney Plant was converted for vehicle production, building the Jeep Grand Wagoneer.



The 2 former airport buildings were no longer depicted on the 1993 USGS aerial photo

(the earliest photo which has been located of the airport property).



A 10/28/11 aerial view showed no trace of the former Stickney Avenue Airport, now covered by a massive truck factory.



As of 2012, the site of Stickney Avenue Airport is the location of the Toledo Supplier Park, which produces the Jeep Wrangler.



The site of Stickney Avenue Airport is located northeast of the intersection of Stickney Avenue & Interstate 75.



Thanks to Don Reed for pointing out this airfield.

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Franklin Airport, Toledo, OH

41.7 North / 83.64 West (Northwest of Columbus, OH)

Franklin Airport, as depicted on the February 1942 Cleveland Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



According to an article in the 6/26/52 Toledo Blade (courtesy of Phil Alloy), Franklin Airport opened in 1939.



However, Franklin Airport was not yet depicted on the 1940 March Cleveland Sectional Chart (courtesy of Richard Finley).



George Ritter recalled, “'At the Franklin Airport on 7/2/40, this was my first flight at the age of 3 & it was in a 1939 Stinson 105, maroon low-power 3-place bird.

The airport was a large grass field with no runway depiction.

Franklin Flight Service was an unknown and later (a year or so) got combined to National Flight Service.”



The earliest depiction which has been located of Franklin Airport

was on the February 1942 Cleveland Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It depicted Franklin as a commercial/municipal airfield.



The earliest dated photo which has been located of Franklin Airport

was a 10/10/43 aerial view looking north from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted Franklin Airport as an open unpaved landing area.



A circa early 1940s aerial view looking at the buildings of the Franklin Ice Cream Company & the hangars of Franklin Airport along Monroe Street (courtesy of Don Reed)

showed at least 3 single-engine aircraft on the grass airfield.



Don Reed recalled that he learned to fly at Franklin Airport in 1944.

According to Don, “My instructor was a World War ! pilot that could preform a ballet with a J3 Cub.

I was to young to drive so I would hitchhike to the airport.”



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described Franklin Airport

as a 104 acre irregularly-shaped field having 3 sod runways, the longest being a 3,000' northwest/southeast strip.

The field was said to have 3 concrete block hangars, the largest measuring 90' x 51'.

Franklin Airport was was described as being owned & operated by private interests.



The earliest topo map depiction which has been located of Franklin Airport was on the 1948 USGS topo map.



The last depiction which has been located of Franklin Airport was on the 1951 USGS topo map.

It depicted Franklin as having 2 unpaved runways in an X-shape, with several buildings on the northwest & northeast sides.



An article entitled “Franklin Airport Slated to Close on Sep. 15” appeared in the 6/26/52 Toledo Blade (courtesy of Phil Alloy).

It described the field as a 104 acre site, with 3 sod runways, 1 T-hangar & 3 cinderblock buildings.



Franklin Airport was no longer depicted on the 1958 USGS topo map.



According to Phil Alloy, “I grew up in Toledo. Franklin Field... in the 1960s the control tower was still standing having been converted to an ice cream store.

The control tower was multi-story so I imagine there was an active field at one time.

By the 1960s the large site was used as a location for radio control model airplane flights.

After the airfield closed the control tower was converted into an ice cream store for the company [Franklin Ice Cream] that owned the air field.”



A 5/1/63 USGS aerial photo showed the majority of the airfield site remained clear, although runways were no longer recognizable.



According to Phil Alloy, “The control tower survived well past all the [other] buildings.

It is the one building that stood until the current mall was constructed in the 1970s.

Due to the growth of the city into the west suburbs the property became increasingly valuable for development.

In the 1970s the site was used for a mall [originally called 'Franklin Park Mall', it is now renamed as 'Westfield Mall'].

No trace of the original airfield exists.”



A 10/7/10 aerial view of the site of Franklin Airport, now the location of Westfield Mall.



The site of Franklin Airport is located southeast of the intersection of Monroe Street & Tallmadge Road.

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National Aviation Airport / National Airport, Toledo, OH

41.72 North / 83.54 West (Northwest of Columbus, OH)

National Airport, as depicted on the February 1942 Cleveland Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



This general aviation airport was evidently established at some point between 1935-42,

as it was not yet depicted on the 1935 Regional Aeronautical Chart.

The earliest depiction which has been located of National Airport

was on the February 1942 Cleveland Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It depicted National as a commercial/municipal airfield.



The earliest photo which has been located of National Aviation Airport

was a 10/10/43 aerial view looking north from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted National Aviation Airport as having 3 grass runways.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described the National Aviation Airport

as a 165 acre irregularly-shaped field having 3 loam & sod runways, the longest being a 3,800' northeast/southwest strip.

The field was said to have 2 concrete block hangars, the largest measuring 120' x 80'.

National Aviation Airport was was described as being owned & operated by private interests.



The 1945 Haire Publishing Company Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

described “National Aviation Airport” as a “class 3” airfield, owned & operated by National Aviation Corporation.

The manager was listed as W.J. Thompson.

The field was said to have 3 sandy & loam runways, with the longest being the 3,800' northeast/southwest strip.

The field was said to have 2 hangars.



National Aviation Airport, as depicted on the 1948 USGS topo map.



A circa 1950 aerial view looking south at National Aviation Airport (from the Toledo Lucas County Public Library, courtesy of Brian Nelson).

It depicted the field as having a grass airfield area, with several hangars on the southwest side,

and a large number of light aircraft.



The 1952 USGS topo map depicted National Airport as having 3 unpaved runways,

with a ramp & hangars at the southwest corner.



The 1953 OH Airport Directory (courtesy of Hank Lehrer)

depicted National Aviation Airport as having 3 runways, including a 3,800' northeast/southwest unpaved runway

and a 2,950' east/west cinder runway.

Several hangars were depicted on the southeast side.

The manager was listed as J.E. Akin.



Tgsaul recalled, “National Airport... I learned to fly there from Aiken Aircraft Corporation starting in 1954,

and later becoming a commercial pilot & flight instructor for John Aiken.”



National Aviation Airport gained a paved runway at some point between 1953-61,

as the 1961 OH Airport Directory (courtesy of Hank Lehrer)

depicted National Airport as having 2 runways, including a 3,800' northeast/southwest runway within which was a 3,000' paved section.

Several hangars were depicted on the southeast side.

The manager was listed as Richard Macauley.



A 1964 aerial photo showed an airfield configuration that contradicted the 1961 diagram,

with a paved east/west runway, but a grass northeast/southwest runway.

A total of 18 light aircraft were visible on the field.



An undated (circa pre-1965) aerial view looking east at National Airport (courtesy of Tom McClain).

The airport had a single asphalt east/west runway, with several hangars on the south side of the field.

The airport appeared well-used, with several single-engine aircraft parked on the field.

Note the building which appeared to be directly at the west end of the runway.



According to Hans Friedebach, “National Airport... During the 1960s it was the home base & operated by National Flightservices Inc.”



A circa 1965 photo of the National Flight Service Inc. hangar at National Airport (from the Toledo Lucas County Public Library).



A circa 1965 photo by Don Reed of his Cessna 175, N7115M, in front of a National Airport hangar.



Roger Johnson recalled of National Airport, “As a kid in the 1960s growing up on the north side of Toledo,

an east wind would have private planes approaching subject airport right over my parent's house.”



The 1969 USGS topo map still depicted National Airport.



The last aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of National Airport

was on the May 1971 Detroit Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It depicted National as having a single 3,100' paved east/west runway.



According to Tom McClain, National Airport was “closed sometime in the early 1970s.

I remember it a an open field where people would fly their radio-controlled planes.”



According to Hans Friedebach, “National was closed sometime around the early 1970s since it could not support itself financially.

It was developed as a shopping center site without a trace of the former airport.”



John Arnold was evidently the last person to land & takeoff at National Airport.

He recalled, “My logbook shows this to have been 7/13/76.

I landed there dead stick in a Piper Arrow on a flight from Alabama to Monroe, MI.

I had run out of gas & had to have some brought to me from Wagon Wheel Airport.

The airport was closed & there were some barrels on the paved runway where kids had bonfires at night.

Wagon Wheel personnel brought me 5 gallons of gas & needless to say you can't see it as viewed from the filler port.

I then flew to Wagon Wheel to top the tanks.

I managed to get out of there before the press showed.

A city policeman was there & took me to a payphone to call for gas to be brought from Wagon Wheel Airport.

Airport buildings had been cleared for the construction of the shopping center.”



According to Roger Johnson, “A major regional mall was built on the site of National during the late 1970s,

obliterating every hint of the very active site.”



By the time of the December 1976 CF-18 World Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy),

National Airport was depicted as an abandoned airfield.



Tom McClain recalled of National Airport, “I'm pretty sure that some time in the 1980s

a small plane was forced to use the field in an emergency landing.”



The 1981 USGS topo map still depicted the east/west paved runway at National Airport,

as well as the taxiways, ramp, and hangars at the southwest corner.

The property was labeled as “Landing Strip (Abandoned)”.



A February 2005 aerial photo showed the mall covering the site, with no trace visible of the former National Airport.



Roger Johnson reported in 2008, “NorthTowne Mall didn't remain viable very long, and while the buildings remain, there is little or no activity

and the parking lots are used for vehicle staging by Chrysler's Jeep plant nearby.”



The site of National Airport is located northwest of the intersection of North Detroit Avenue & East Alexis Road.

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Lima Airport / Allen County Airport (LIA), Lima, OH

40.76 North / 84.18 West (Northwest of Columbus, OH)

Lima Airport, as depicted on a 1936-37 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



According to the website of WTLW 44, the Allen County Airport was built in 1933.



The earliest directory listing of the field which has been located

was in the 1934 Department of Commerce Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It described Lima as a Municipal Airport, located three miles northwest of the town of Lima.

The airfield was said to consist of three sod runways,

with the longest being a 2,640' northeast/southwest strip.

A hangar was said to be located in the northwest corner.

 

The Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airports Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo)

described Lima as having three sod runways, with the longest being the 3,960' east/west strip.

A hangar on the west side was said to have "Lima" painted on the roof.



The only photo which has been located showing Lima Municipal Airport while in operation

was a 9/28/43 aerial view looking north from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted the field as being an open grass area.



The 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

described Lima Airport as having a 4,200' unpaved runway.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described the Lima Municipal Airport

as a 144 acre L-shaped field having 2 sod runways, the longest being a 4,200' east/west strip (described as “rough”).

The field was said to have 3 concrete & steel hangars, the largest measuring 75' x 60'.

Lima Municipal Airport was was described as being owned & operated by private interests.



Lima Airport, as depicted on the June 1946 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



A circa 1940s-50s aerial view of Lima Airport, presumably during some kind of display – note the B-29 bomber fuselage.



According to the website of WTLW 44,

the golden years for the Allen County Airport were 1953-63,

when Lake Central Airlines ran DC-3 service to Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and Columbus.



Starting on the June 1960 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

the field was labeled as the Allen County Airport.

It had also gained a paved runway, as it was depicted as having a single 3,500' paved runway.

 

The 1960 USGS topo map depicted Allen County Airport as having a single paved east/west runway,

with a ramp & 4 buildings on the west side.



By the next year, the Lima Airport had apparently reverted to its previous name,

as depicted on the December 1961 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



A newer airport was built on the east side of Lima in 1963,

but the original airport continued in operation.



The 1966 OH Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

depicted Lima as having a single 3,500' bituminous east/west runway,

with a parallel 2,600' sod runway on the north side of the paved runway,

and a 2,640' sod north/south runway.

A total of four hangars were depicted on the northwest side of the field.

The manager was listed as Walt Plezia.

 

The 1972 Flight Guide (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) showed that Lima had gained an NDB navigational beacon on the field.

The runway configuration had not changed.

 

The Lima Airport's status had changed at some point between 1972-76 to a private field,

as that is how it was described in the 1976 AOPA Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

By 1977, the USGS topo map depicted that a new Allen County Airport had been constructed,

five miles southeast of the town of Lima.

 

The original Lima Airport was apparently closed at some point between 1976-80.



An undated photo of the former hangar (courtesy of John Sams), with the words “Aviation Corporation” still visible,

during the hangars conversion into a TV studio.



According to the website of WTLW 44, after the closure of the airport,

Ron Mighell toured the large 80' x 80' hangar and envisioned it as the largest television studio in Northwest Ohio.

In 1980, scores of volunteers pooled their talents to renovate the dilapidated building into a modern television production facility.”



The original Lima Airport was no longer listed at all in the 1982 AOPA Airport Directory (courtesy of Ed Drury).



In the 1988 USGS aerial photo,

the former Lima Airport appeared to remain largely intact,

with the runways & most of the hangars appearing to remain completely untouched.

The TV transmitter tower could be seen just northwest of the west end of the runway.



The 1994 USGS topo map depicted a single paved east/west runway,

labeled simply as “Landing Strip”, along with several hangars on the west side of the field.



A circa 2007 aerial view looking east at the site of the former Lima Airport showed (from the left) the pavement from the former 3 t-hangars,

the former hangar, the TV transmitter tower, and the remains of the paved runway.



John Sams reported in 2007, “The old main hangar is now the main studio / office for the local Christian TV station 44.

Nothing appears to remain of the old runway except the clearing [however the runway appears to remain intact in the 2006 photo].

The small hangars to the north of the main are only slabs foundations.

The main transmission tower for the TV station

(which appears on the current Detroit Sectional as a lighted obstruction of 1,532' MSL to the northwest of the city)

appears to be sitting right at the start of Runway 9.

New houses are being built close to the east side of the old runway clearing.

It will not be long & they will be on the old runway site.



A 4/6/12 aerial view looking northeast showed the former Lima Airport appeared to remain largely intact,

with the runways & some of the hangars appearing to remain completely untouched.



The site of Lima Airport is located southeast of the intersection of Neely Road & Baty Road.

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Camp Perry National Guard Airfields #1 & #2, Camp Perry, OH

41.55 North / 83.04 West (West of Cleveland, OH)

Camp Perry was depicted as an auxiliary airfield on the 1928 Air Navigation Map (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



The state legislature authorized the purchase of 300 acres of land at what would become Camp Perry in 1906,

to establish a rifle range for the state militia.



The date of construction of the first airfield at Camp Perry has not been determined.

Historical accounts of the Camp do not mention anything about an airfield.



The earliest depiction of the Camp Perry Airfield which has been located

was on the 1928 Air Navigation Map (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It depicted Camp Perry as an auxiliary airfield.



An article in the 5/21/32 issue of the Sandusky Star Journal (courtesy of Tom Kowalczk) described the “new” Camp Perry Airfield:

The new airfield which is being made at Camp Perry for the Ohio National Guard maneuvers,

was Inspected by Adjutant General Frank Henderson; Assistant Adjutant General Lt. Col. John Volka,

and Capt. Fred Smith, Director of Aeronautics of the State, who came to the camp yesterday afternoon by airplane from Columbus,

and Major Errol Zlstel, Commander of the 112th Observation Squadron, who also came by plane from Cleveland.

The new field, which is to the west of the Camp Perry grounds, contains more than 100 acres,

and will replace the present field which is used along the firing line & ranges of the camp.

The new field will eliminate the Interference of the training activities on the old field, when national matches or camp training maneuvers were being held.

This new field will also be used as an emergency field for other air traffic.”



The 1934 Department of Commerce Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

listed 2 airfields at Camp Perry, both under the title of "Camp Perry Field, National Guard".

The first field was described as being located "at the Camp Perry Rifle Range",

and was described as having two sod landing strips, forming an "L" shape, of 4,000' & 3,000'.

The second field was described as being located "One-half mile west of Camp Perry",

and was described as being an irregularly-shaped sod field, measuring 2,508' x 3,163'.



The 1935 9M Night Flying Chart depicted "Camp Perry Rifle Range" as a military airfield.



An aerial photo of the Camp Perry #1 & #2 Airfields,

from The Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airports Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo).

The directory described the "Camp Perry (#1) Rifle Range Field" as being located on the east side of the Camp,

and the "Camp Perry (#2) Camp Perry Airport" on the west side of the Camp.

Both fields were otherwise described in the same manner as the 1934 directory.



Major John Kachenmeister recalled, "I used to have some photos of the airfield.

The planes were flown by the 112th Observation Squadron,

and included at least one O-47, and two types of biplanes that I could not identify.

The 112th Observation Squadron was the air reconnaissance element of the 37th Infantry Division, OH National Guard.

The airfield was a sod runway aligned north/south,

with the large building on the east side of the post serving as a maintenance hangar."



 

"Camp Perry" was still depicted as an active military airfield

on the 1941 Regional Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



However, the Camp Perry Airfields apparently were closed at some point between 1941-43,

as no airfields were depicted at the Camp on the April 1943 Cleveland Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy),

the January 1949 Cleveland Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy), or on a 10/1/51 USGS aerial photo.



A 10/1/51 USGS aerial photo showed the site of the Camp Perry #1 Airfield on the east side of the Camp

and the "Camp Perry #2 Airfield on the west side of the Camp.



The 1952 USGS topo map seemed to indicate that both fields were closed at that point,

as it did not label the site of the Camp Perry #1 as an airfield of any kind,

and it depicted a large building on the site of the Camp Perry #2 airfield.

Furthermore, it did not depict any other airfields on the Camp property nearby.



However, apparently one of the two Camp Perry Airfields was reopened at some point between 1943-53,

as the 1953 Flight Chart (courtesy of Scott O'Donnell) depicted "Camp Perry (Army)" as an active airfield,

with a 3,800' unpaved runway.



The July 1956 Cleveland Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) depicted "Camp Perry (Army)" as an active military airfield.

The Aerodromes table on the chart described the field as having a 3,800 turf all-way landing area,

and the remarks said, "Restricted to official use. Operated by National Guard."



The Camp Perry airfield was closed (again) at some point within the next year,

as it was no longer depicted at all on the January 1957 Cleveland Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy)

or subsequent aeronautical charts.



As seen in the 1995 USGS aerial photo,

the property of the Rifle Range #1 Airfield remains undeveloped - presumably still used as a rifle range.

However, a large building still occupies the site of the #2 Airfield, on the west side of the Camp.



Camp Perry continues to operate (as of 2003) as a National Guard training center,

but without an airfield.



Major John Kachenmeister (who was "stationed at Camp Perry off & on since the 1970s") reported in 2005,

"The airfield is still semi-active, as several helicopter pads are installed on what was formerly the runway.

It is not listed on the current sectional charts,

however, upon occasion helicopters are used for dignitary visits or for airmobility training of Guard troops."



The site of the Camp Perry Airfields is located north of the intersection of Route 2 & Avenue K.

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Bellefontaine Municipal Airport (7I7), Bellefontaine, OH

40.41 North / 83.74 West (Northeast of Dayton, OH)

Bellefontaine Airport, as depicted on the May 1968 Cleveland Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



This municipal airport was apparently built at some point between 1965-68,

as it was not depicted on a 1959 aerial photo, the 1961 USGS topo map, nor the 1965 Cleveland Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy).

The earliest reference to Bellefontaine Municipal which has been located

was on the May 1968 Cleveland Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It depicted Bellefontaine Airport as having a single 4,400' paved runway.



The 1973 USGS topo map depicted Bellefontaine Airport as having a single paved northeast/southwest airport with a ramp & 2 buildings on the northwest side.

 

The 1976 AOPA Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

described Bellefontaine Municipal as having a single 4,400' asphalt Runway 4/22,

and said that the field offered hangars, flight instruction, and charters.

The operator was listed as Dynamic Aviation, Inc.

 

The 1982 AOPA Airport Directory (courtesy of Ed Drury)

described Bellefontaine Municipal as having a single 4,400' asphalt Runway 4/22,

and listed the operator as Brenner Air Service.

 

Unfortunately, constraints on the growth of the original Municipal Airport would eventually cause its replacement.

The existing airport had a 4,400' runway, with turn-arounds on each end.

The landing thresholds for both runway ends were displaced 200' due to obstructions in the approaches.

Expanding the existing airport to meet forecasted demand would be limited due to existing constraints,

including State Road 68 & a nearby railroad & landfill.

 

As described in AOPA Online, planning for a replacement airport for the city of Bellefontaine began in the 1980s,

when Robert Lentz, then a city councilman began pushing for a replacement airfield.

The plan originally faced strong opposition, but over time, and with the help of the aviation community,

Lentz won enough support for the project to go ahead.

The community effort continued when a local businessman & area pilot agreed to buy

the current FBO (Midwest Corporate Air) & take over management of the airport for the city.

 

The only photo which has been located showing Bellefontaine Airport while in operation as a 3/21/94 USGS aerial view looking southwest,

which showed 4 single-engine aircraft on its ramp.



Diagram from the 2001 OH Airport Directory.



In 2002, AOPA President Phil Boyer joined Mayor Robert Lentz & other local dignitaries in Bellefontaine

for the grand opening of the brand-new $13 million Bellefontaine Regional Airport.

It was only the second new airport in Ohio in 30 years.

The new airport is located 4 miles west of the original Municipal Airport,

which was presumably be closed at the same point.



A 2004 aerial view confirmed that the original Bellefontaine Airport had been closed,

as it had closed-runway “X” symbols painted on the runway.



A 4/6/12 aerial view looking southwest showed Bellefontaine Municipal Airport to remain intact.



Bellefontaine Municipal is located southeast of the intersection of Route 68 & Twp Highway 57,

three miles north-northeast of the town of Bellefontaine.

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Waco Aircraft Company Factory Airfield / Troy-Waco Airport, Troy, OH

40.03 North / 84.22 West (North of Dayton, OH)

A 1929 aerial view looking southwest at the Waco Troy Factory.



The Waco Aircraft Company came to Troy, OH, in 1923.

Their facility in Troy built a long series of Waco biplanes.

The complex eventually consisted of a factory, a cafeteria building,

and 2 hangars which served as a final assembly building.



The earliest photo which has been located of the Waco complex was a 1929 aerial view,

depicting the factory, with the cafeteria building in front, next to a circular driveway.



An undated view of the interior of the Waco Troy Factory.



A circa 1930 photo of the Waco Troy factory, showing an aircraft visible inside the door.



Waco-Troy Airport, as depicted on a 1936-37 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

An aerial view looking west from The Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airports Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo).

It depicted the factory, with the hangars in the background, and the cafeteria building in front, next to the circular driveway.

The directory described the Waco airfield as consisting of a 90 acre sod field.

 

The Waco factory also built military gliders during WW2.



A 9/28/43 aerial view looking north from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock)

depicted the “Waco-Troy Airport” as an irregularly-shaped grass field, with the factory on the east side.



The 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

described the Waco-Troy Airfield as having a 2,900' runway.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described the “Waco-Troy Airport”

as a 130 acre L-shaped sod field measuring 2,850' x 2,500'.

The field was said to have 2 hangars, the largest being a 120' x 80' wood & metal structure.

Waco-Troy Airport was was described as being owned & operated by private interests.



The 1946 Chicago Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy) depicted the field as "Waco-Troy".



An undated (circa 1950s?) aerial view looking southeast at the Waco Troy factory.



 

The June 1960 Chicago Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy) still depicted Waco as an active airfield.

The aerodromes table described the field as having a total of 5 runways, with the longest being a 3,100' turf strip,

but also described it as an "all way" landing area.



The last depiction which has been located of the Troy-Waco Airport was on the 1961 USGS topo map.

It depicted Troy-Waco Airport as an irregularly-shaped outline to the northwest of the factory buildings.



The Waco airfield was evidently closed at some point after 1961,

and the runway was built-over in the 1960s.



As seen in the 1994 USGS aerial photo,

the original factory with the circular driveway pictured in the 1929 photo is still visible (in the center-right of the 1994 photo).

The hangars still remained as well,

but the cafeteria building adjacent to the driveway had evidently been removed at some point between 1937-94.



As of 2002, the factory was being used as a warehouse.

Amazingly, the equipment used to steam & shrink the fabric onto the Waco airframes

was reportedly still stored up in the rafters of the former factory.



A 2004 aerial view showed that the majority of the circular driveway had been removed at some point between 1994-2004.



A link to aviation remains at the site of the former Waco factory,

as the Goodrich Corporation Aircraft Wheels & Brakes Division

has a large plant adjacent to the former Waco facility to the southwest,

where they manufacture brakes for military aircraft & the Space Shuttle.



A circa 2007 aerial view looking west at the former Waco factory.

The circular driveway in front of the factory had evidently been removed at some point between 1994-2007.



A circa 2007 aerial view looking west at the 2 former Waco hangars on the northwest side of the complex.

The east side of the hangars were marked with “GOKOH Corp.”



A July 2010 photo by Dick Merrill looking south at the 2 former Waco hangars on the northwest side of the complex.



A July 2010 photo by Dick Merrill looking west at the former Waco factory.



The site of the Waco factory is located southwest of the intersection of Peters Road & Archer Drive.

 

The Waco Air Museum maintains a small museum a short distance away from the former Waco Factory.

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