Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields:

Texas, Amarillo area

© 2002, © 2014 by Paul Freeman. Revised 4/10/14.

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Please consider a financial contribution to support the continued growth & operation of this site.



(Original) Amarillo Municipal Airport (revised 4/10/14) - Dalhart Aux AAF #1 (revised 4/6/13)

Dalhart Aux AAF #2 / Miller Field (revised 3/15/13) - KFDA-TV Airfield (revised 2/4/06)

Pampa AAF (revised 4/10/14) - Reeves Aux AAF #1 / Pampa Air Force Aux Airfield #2 (revised 4/10/14)



KFDA-TV Airfield, Amarillo, TX

35.29 North / 101.84 West (North of Downtown Amarillo, TX)

The KFDA-TV airfield, as depicted on the March 1962 Oklahoma City Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks).

Photo of the airfield while open has not been located.



The KFDA Airfield was not yet depicted on the 1949 OK City Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Price).



According to John Fullingim, “The KFDA strip was established by a KFDA weather man in the 1950s.

His name was Dan True & he was a local celebrity.

He had a Piper Cub & lived down near Palo Duro Canyon & flew to work many days.

I worked with him at KGNC in 1974. He often talked about his flying on the air & was quite a character.”



The KFDA-TV Airfield was not yet depicted on the 1961 Oklahoma City Sectional Chart (according to David Brooks).

The earliest depiction of the KFDA-TV Airfield which has been located

was on the March 1962 Oklahoma City Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks).

It depicted KFDA-TV as a private airfield having a 1,500' unpaved runway.



The 1966 TX Airport Directory (courtesy of David Brooks) depicted the KFDA-TV Airfield

as having 2 turf runways: 1,800 Runway 8/26 & 1,600 Runway 17/35.

The runways were located immediately adjacent to the southeast of the tower & supporting wires of the television transmitter,

which must have made approached to the runways quite interesting.

A single building of T-hangars was located northwest of the runway intersection.

The operator was listed as Dan True [who was also the weatherman at KFDA-TV].



The 1966 AOPA Airport Directory (according to David Brooks) described the KFDA-TV Airfield

as having 3 runways, all turf/sod, with the longest being the 1,500' Runway 9/27.

The operator was listed as Dan True,

and warnings were included for high towers & electrical power lines around the edges of the airfield.

No hangar facilities were described - just tie-downs.



A 1967 aerial photo showed an open grass field, without any recognizable runways,

with the single T-hangar building on the northwest side.



USGS topo maps from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s did not depict an airfield of any kind.



The February 1970 DFW Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks)

depicted the KFDA-TV airfield as having a 1,700' unpaved runway.

 

The last chart depiction of KFDA-TV as an active airfield which has been located

was on the 1972 DFW Sectional Chart (according to David Brooks).



According to John Fullingim, “The gigantic transmission towers were built in the early 1970s,

and were not there when Dan was at KFDA.

I have been to the KFDA site many times.”

The KFDA-TV Airfield was evidently closed at some point between 1972-78,

as it was no longer depicted on the 1978 DFW Sectional Chart (according to David Brooks).



The 1995 USGS aerial photo showed that a new transmitter tower had been built somewhat to the east of the old one,

roughly over the northern portion of the former airfield.



In the 2002 USGS aerial photo, traces of the 2 former runways were still apparent.

No airfield buildings appeared to remain.



The site of the KFDA-TV Airfield is located southeast of the intersection of West Cherry Avenue & Broadway Road.

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(Original) Amarillo Municipal Airport, Amarillo, TX

35.23 North / 101.78 West (Northeast of Downtown Amarillo, TX)

A 10/13/43 aerial view looking north at Amarillo Municipal Airport

from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).



The town of Amarillo had a short-lived municipal airport located 6 miles northeast of the center of the town.

The Amarillo Municipal Airport was evidently established at some point between 1937-43,

as it was not yet listed among active airfields in the Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airport Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo).

The earliest depiction of the Amarillo Municipal Airport which has been located

was a 10/13/43 aerial view from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted the field as consisting of a square unpaved landing area.



The April 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

described Amarillo Airport as having a 1,500' hard-surface runway, with a "5,200' x 4,500' all-way field available".

It also indicated that Army flight operations were conducted from the field.



The original Amarillo Airport, as depicted on the 1944 Oklahoma City Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks).



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described Amarillo Municipal Airport

as a 460 acre irregularly-shaped property within which were 2 bituminous runways (1,458' northeast/southwest & 1,000' NNW/SSE)

within a 4,500' x 3,000' all-way sod landing area.

The field was said to have 4 hangars, the largest being a 105' x 90' brick & steel structure.

Amarillo Municipal Airport was said to be owned by the City of Amarillo & operated by private interests.



An undated aerial view of the original Amarillo Airport from the Haire Publishing Company's 1948 Airport Directory (courtesy of David Brooks).

The directory described the field as consisting of an area measuring 5,200' x 4,500' x 3,000',

within which were 3 paved runways.

The photo depicted several hangars (one of which had “Amarillo Flying Service” painted on the roof),

along with dozens of light aircraft.



The last chart depiction which has been located of the original Amarillo Airport as an active airfield

was on the 1949 OK City Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Price),

which depicted it as having a 5,200' unpaved runway.



The original Amarillo Airport was evidently closed at some point between 1949-54,

as it was no longer depicted on the 1954 Albuquerque Sectional Chart (according to David Brooks),

nor on the 1956 USGS topo map.

It was most likely closed after the much larger English Field (3 miles to the east, known today as Amarillo International Airport)

was opened by the military to civilian air traffic.



No trace of the former airport was recognizable on a 1967 aerial photo.



In the 1995 USGS aerial photo, not a trace of the former airfield was recognizable.

 

In the 2002 USGS aerial photo, not a trace of the former airfield was recognizable.

 

The site of the original Amarillo Airport is located northeast of the intersection of Route 50 & Route 136.

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Dalhart Aux AAF #1 / West Field, Dalhart, TX

36 North / 102.69 West (Northwest of Amarillo, TX)

A 10/13/43 aerial view looking north at “Dalhart Army Air Field Auxiliary #1 (West Field)”

from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).



This very large airfield was built during WW2 as one of 2 auxiliary fields for Dalhart AAF,

(a few miles to the east), which conducted training in the B-17, B-24, B-29, B-32, and also the Waco glider.



The date of construction of Dalhart Aux #1 has not been determined.

The earliest depiction which has been located of the field

was a 10/13/43 aerial view from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted “Dalhart Army Air Field Auxiliary #1 (West Field)”

as having 3 paved runways, with a large paved ramp on the east side

and a substantial number of buildings on a street grid to the east of the ramp.



As depicted on a 1943 Army plan (courtesy of John Voss),

Dalhart Aux AAF #1 consisted of 3 paved 8,000' runways,

taxiways & a large concrete ramp (measuring 211,000 square yards).



The 1944 Albuquerque Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss) depicted Dalhart Aux #1 as having its own control tower.



Dalhart AAF & its 2 auxiliary fields,

as depicted on the 1945 Trinidad Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

According to Matthew Byrd (who grew up adjacent to Dalhart AAF),

Auxiliary Field #1 was known as the West Base among locals.

There were several other areas designated for dropping dummy munitions spaced in between the bases

(one of them northeast of Conlen).

According to Byrd, the West Base was also used as a camp for German prisoners of war.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described “Dalhart Army Air Field Auxiliary #1 (West Field)”

as a 1,910 acre square-shaped property within which were 3 bituminous 8,100' runways,

oriented north/south, northeast/southwest, and northwest/southeast.

The field was said to have a single 202' x 117' steel & wood hangar,

to be owned by the U.S. Government, and operated by the Army Air Forces.

However, the title of the listing described the field as Inactive.



"Dalhart AF #1" was still depicted as an active military airfield

on the 1949 Trinidad Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy).

It was described as having an 8,100' hard-surface runway.

 

Dalhart Aux #1 was closed at some point between 1949-63,

as it was labeled "Abandoned airport" on the October 1963 World Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



As of the 1996 USGS aerial photo,

the outlines of the runways & taxiways were still plainly apparent,

but most of their pavement had been removed.

The ramp pavement still remained,

as the ramp may have been used as a makeshift runway after the runways themselves were removed (as was done at Dalhart Aux #2).

It appears as if the single hangar had been removed,

but its walls remained standing (also just like the hangar at Dalhart Aux #2).

 

The locked gate at the entrance to Dalhart Aux #1, 1998.

A water tower & the concrete sides of a hangar still remain.



A circa 2001-2005 aerial photo showed that the majority of 2 of the runways still remained intact,

with the pavement of the 3rd runway having largely been removed.

The ramp pavement also still remained.



A 10/11/15 aerial view by Mike Brown looking southwest at the extensive remains of Dalhart Auxiliary Field #1.

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Dalhart Aux AAF #2 / Miller Field (2E1), Dalhart, TX

36.09 North / 102.42 West (Northwest of Amarillo, TX)

A 10/13/43 aerial view looking north at “Dalhart Army Air Field Auxiliary #2 (East Field)”

from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).



This field was built during WW2 as one of 2 auxiliary fields for Dalhart AAF,

(a few miles to the southwest), which conducted training in B-17s, B-24s, B-29s & B-32s.

It was also known as Witt Field.



The date of construction of Dalhart Aux #2 has not been determined.

The earliest depiction which has been located of the field

was a 10/13/43 aerial view from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted “Dalhart Army Air Field Auxiliary #2 (East Field)”

as having 3 paved runways, with a large paved ramp on the east side

and a substantial number of buildings on a street grid to the east of the ramp.



As depicted on a 1943 Army plan (courtesy of John Voss),

Dalhart Aux AAF #2 consisted of 3 paved 8,000' runways,

taxiways & a large concrete ramp (measuring 205,000 square yards).



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described “Dalhart Army Air Field Auxiliary #2 (East Field)”

as an irregularly-shaped property within which were 3 bituminous 8,500' runways,

oriented north/south, northeast/southwest, and northwest/southeast.

The field was said to not have any hangars, and to be operated by the Army Air Forces.

However, the title of the listing described the field as Inactive.



"Dalhart AF #2" was still depicted as an active military airfield

on the 1949 Trinidad Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy).

It was described as having an 8,000' hard-surface runway.

 

According to Matthew Byrd (who grew up adjacent to Dalhart AAF),

Auxiliary Field #2 was known as the East Base among locals.

 

Dalhart Aux #2 was apparently closed by the military at some point between 1949-63,

as it was labeled "Abandoned airport" on the October 1963 World Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



However, the former Dalhart Aux #2 field was apparently reopened as a civilian airport at some point between 1963-70,

as it was listed as Miller Field in the 1970 TX Airport Directory (courtesy of Ray Brindle).

It was named for Delmar Miller, a WW2-era instructor.



According to Matthew Byrd, Miller Field "used to be a hopping place in the 1960s & 1970s."



The 1973 USGS topo map depicted the former Dalhart Aux #2 ramp as “Miller Airfield”.

Three buildings were depicted to the east of the ramp, and 1 building was depicted on the ramp.

The former runways were no longer depicted at all.



In the 1985 TX Airport Directory (courtesy of Steve Cruse),

it can be seen that the runways of the former AAF were abandoned,

with the former ramp & a taxiway being reused as a 6,500' Runway 17/35.

The manager was listed as Delmar Miller.



In the 1996 USGS aerial photo, the remnants of the 3 former paved runways were still discernible,

although most of their pavement had been removed.

The paved ramp & taxiway on the east side of the field remained intact,

but there was no sign of any based aircraft.



The still-standing concrete sides were the only remaining portions of a hangar at Dalhart Aux #2 in 1998.

They were being used for storage.



In a circa 2001-2005 aerial photo, the remnants of the 3 former paved runways were still discernible,

although most of their pavement had been removed (except oddly for the very ends of most of the runways).

The paved ramp & taxiway on the east side of the field remained intact.



As of 2002, the field was still in use as Miller Field, which supports infrequent crop-dusting operations.

It was described as being nearly deserted by general aviation pilots who have visited,

although the FAA Airport/Facility Directory listed a total of 4 aircraft as being based at the field.



Miller Field was evidently abandoned (for reasons unknown) at some point between 2002-2006,

as it was no longer listed in the FAA Airport/Facility Directory as of 2006 (according to Chris Kennedy).



Mike Brown reported from a 10/15/11 overflight, “I saw Dalhart #2, but I didn’t realize [at the time] it was what’s left of a WWII bomber field.

All you can see is the ramp, and it looks like an incredibly wide but not very long runway.”



Michael Dennis reported on 7/27/13, “Dalhart Aux #2: I wandered into this site when I saw the airport sign.

There are 2 cropdusters & what looked like a Cessna 172.

They were all more or less in a open hangar & no one [was] around.

Apparently the hangar was of postwar construction.

There was an office that looked like a Unicom office but open to the environment.

Judging from the interior ....probably early 1970s. Definitely not being used as a regular airport.”



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Pampa Army Airfield, Pampa, TX

35.53 North / 100.76 (Northeast of Amarillo, TX)

A 1942 U.S. Army facility area map of Pampa AAF.



This site was a pre-WW2 airfield which was taken over in 1942 by the AAF

as part of the 70,000 Pilot Training Program.

It was used by the Army Air Corps as a twin-engine flying school,

offering advanced twin-engine training in AT-10s.

Also stationed at the field were AT-9s, B-25s, and AT-17s.

The military airfield site encompassed 2,545 acres.

It was also known as the "Eagles' Nest of the High Plains".



The earliest depiction which has been located of Pampa AAF was a 1942 U.S. Army facility area map.

It depicted Pampa as having 4 paved runways,

with a large paved ramp on the west side,

and a “Administrative & housing area” street grid to the west of the ramp.



Calvin Casteel recalled, “I did Advanced Flight Training in AT-9, AT-10, and AT-17s at Pampa Army Air Field,

graduating in February 16, 1943.”



Improvements to the site included four 3,500' runways, a large paved ramp area, hangars,

a street grid with numerous buildings, water wells & a tower, a sewage disposal plant,

and ordnance areas & a skeet range.



The earliest photo which has been located of Pampa AAF

was a 10/13/43 aerial view looking north from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted Pampa as having 4 paved runways, with a large ramp on the west side,

with a large number of buildings west of the ramp.



A circa-1943 postcard from Pampa Field (courtesy of Steve Cruse).



An undated cover of a Pampa Army Air Field book.



An AT-17 trainer being prepared for a night flight inside a Pampa hangar during WW2.



Pampa AAF & its satellite fields, as depicted on the 1945 Oklahoma City Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss).

 

During WW2, Pampa had a total of 4 satellite fields:

Reeves Aux #1 (6 miles south of Pampa, TX),

Thompson Aux #2 (6 miles NNW of Pampa, TX), later reused as Perry Lefors Airport,

Hoover Aux #3 (9 miles northwest of Pampa AAF), of which no trace remains,

and Laketon Aux #4 (9 miles ENE of Pampa AAF), of which no trace remains.



During its 3 years of operation the base graduated 6,292 cadets.



Pampa AAF was closed in 1945.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described Pampa AAF

as a 2,544 acre square-shaped property within which were 4 bituminous runways,

the longest being the 6,540' northeast/southwest & northwest/southeast strips.

The field was said to have a total of 5 wooden hangars, the largest being a 202' x 163' structure.

Pampa was said to be owned by the U.S. Government, and operated by the Army Air Forces,

and to have 2 auxiliary fields (Reeves #1 & Thompson #2).

The other 2 auxiliary fields were evidently abandoned before 1945.

However, the title of Pampa AAF's listing described the field as Inactive.



A 1946 “Key Plan” (National Archives, courtesy of Ron Plante) depicted Pampa Army Airfield

as having 4 paved runways, taxiways, a large ramp, a street grid in a housing area, and an ordnance area to the north.



Pampa AAF was transferred as surplus to the Corps of Engineers in 1947.



It was then acquired by the Air Force in 1948 & redesignated Pampa AF Auxiliary Field #1.



It was depicted as "Pampa AF #1" on the 1949 Oklahoma City Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Price).



The Pampa airfield remained on the Air Force property rolls until at least 1952, but was then closed again,

and the property was declared excess in 1955.



The last depiction which has been located of the Pampa airfield was on the 1956 USGS topo map,

which labeled the field as "Pampa AF #1".



The last tract of land of the Pampa airfield was sold in 1957.



Calvin Casteel recalled, “I visited what was remaining of Pampa Army Air Field in 1963 -

all that remained was a couple of hangars & part of the ramp which was being used as a cattle feed lot.”



The Pampa airfield was no longer depicted at all on the 1965 topo map

nor on the 1978 DFW Sectional Chart (courtesy of Ray Brindle).



In 1982 a Texas Historical Commission historical marker was placed near the site,

at the intersection of Rt.152 & Farm Road 3302.



As seen in the 1996 USGS aerial photo,

the only remaining elements of the former airfield were portions of the paved ramp area,

at least one hangar & several other buildings, and portions of the street grid.

All of the runways had been removed, with their location reverted to farmland.

The outline of the northeast/southwest runway was still barely discernible in the farmland.



Recent photo of the remains of the Pampa ramp.

 

Recent photo of a remaining hangar at Pampa.

 

Scott Murdock visited the site of Pampa AAF in 2003,

and reported that "Most of the airfield is fenced off & used for farming.

The runway patterns are faintly visible in aerial photos, but the ground is now farmland.

The most obvious remnant of AAF use is the concrete water tower."

 

A 2003 Army Corps of Engineers diagram of the WW2-era property boundaries of Pampa AAF.



The airfield at Pampa was not depicted at all (even as abandoned) on recent aeronautical charts or topo maps.



A 4/1/08 aerial photo showed Pampa's ramp & streets remained intact.

A faint outline of the northeast/southwest runway was still barely recognizable in the farmland.



The remnants of Pampa AAF are located southeast of the intersection of Route 152 & Ranch Road 1474.



See also:

A historical description from the Handbook of Texas Online.

A 1996 Army Corps of Engineers Project Fact Sheet.

A 1994 Army Corps of Engineers Ordnance & Explosives report.

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Reeves Auxiliary Army Airfield #1 / Pampa Air Force Auxiliary Airfield #2, Pampa, TX

35.45 North / 100.98 West (Northeast of Amarillo, TX)

A 10/13/43 aerial view looking north at “Pampa Army Air Field Auxiliary #1 (Reeves Field)”

from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).



This field was built during WW2 as one of 4 satellite fields for Pampa AAF (13 miles northeast),

which conducted advanced twin-engine training in AT-10s, AT-9s, B-25s, and AT-17s.

 

The dates of construction of Pampa Auxiliary #1 has not been determined,

but the parent field became operational in 1942.



The earliest depiction which has been located of Pampa Aux #1

was a 10/13/43 aerial view from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted the field as consisting of 3 paved runways in a triangular layout.

No buildings or other improvements were visible.



The earliest aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Reeves Aux #1

was on the 1945 Oklahoma City Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss),

which depicted Reeves #1 along with Pampa AAF & its other satellite fields.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described “Pampa Army Air Field Auxiliary #1 (Reeves Field)”

as a 640 acre square-shaped property within which were 3 bituminous 4,500' runways,

oriented north/south, northeast/southwest, and northwest/southeast.

The field was said to not have any hangars,

to be owned by the U.S. Government, and operated by the Army Air Forces.

However, the title of the listing described the field as Inactive.



The last depiction which has been located of this airfield was on the 1949 Oklahoma City Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Price),

which confusingly labeled it as “Pampa AF #2".



Reeves Auxiliary #1 stayed on the books until at least 1952.

 

By 1978, it was no longer depicted at all (not even as an abandoned airfield)

on the DFW Sectional Chart (courtesy of Ray Brindle).



Two 1994 views of the site of Reeves Aux #1.



As seen in the 1996 USGS aerial photo,

the airfield consisted of three 4,200' runways,

which have deteriorated greatly but were still plainly discernible.

There did not appear to have been any hangars at the field.



Scott Murdock visited the site of Reeves Auxiliary #1 in 2003,

and reported that "The airfield is now farmed.

Aerial photos still show the runway patterns, though I could not discern them from ground level."

 

The airfield was no longer depicted at all (even as abandoned) on recent aeronautical charts or USGS topo maps.



A 4/1/08 aerial photo showed the 3 runways remained quite recognizable.



The site of Reeves Auxiliary #1 airfield is located along the west side of Route 70, 6 miles south of the town of Pampa.

 

See also:

A 1996 Army Corps of Engineers Project Fact Sheet.

A 1994 Army Corps of Engineers Ordnance & Explosives report.

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